Searching for poetry of of a newer generation of gothic literature led me to the man I got to interview today. Upon reviewing his work I instantly fell in love with his style. Reminiscent of the great Edgar Allan Poe I was impressed and reached out. Connecting with Mr. Sheppard has been a very interesting and enlightening delight. We connected over music and over poetic style. I have learned recently he is a fan of my bold and raw emotional poetry, which thrilled me to know that someone has connected with my poetic work.

All that led to the recent reaching out to learn more about his work, his life, and his projects.


Let me start off with a quote from John Foster from your book Thirteen Nocturnes, in which the foreword begins with:  “It takes guts to write and publish a book of poetry at this point in the history of the world.” I wholeheartedly agreed when I read this portion and it left me with one question. At what point did you want to begin a poetry book?

William Blake and certain other experiences — not poetry, but experiences — have been a guide for me. Recent trauma started me out on this path. My poems sketch out a full cosmogony of pain.

Was the process difficult for you when it began?

It was difficult for me when it began. It’s still difficult for me. It feels like it will probably always be difficult, but there’s no other way I can imagine it would be. Life’s difficult, and it ends in death. In the meantime, we experience wonderful things, but they do all end in the grave. I think my writing reflects this inherent problem of our existence.

Your work is exquisite and reminiscent of Gothic literature; was that by design or the natural way it flows from you?

Thank you for those kind words. It’s both.

My favorite literary works tend to fall under a broadly gothic umbrella, and I suppose that style of writing flows from me naturally. But, as a caveat, I wouldn’t say every poem I’ve written is gothic. I try to choose a tone appropriate for what I want an individual poem to achieve.

Also, I’d consider myself to fall broadly within the domain of Southern Gothic literature. Readers and critics can ultimately decide for themselves. I love cosmic horror, and I love many contemporary “weird poets” (a term proudly brandished by folks wishing to imitate and perhaps build upon the poetry of Clark Ashton Smith, George Sterling, and the poets championed by Weird Tales authors about a century ago),  but I’m probably only a fellow traveler, and a fan (but very much a fan), of weird poetry more than I am any sort of evangelist of that particular school of writing. There are many good poets writing in the weird poetry tradition nowadays, and some of them are the best living dark poets I know of. But my own upbringing has been ensconced in the Deep American South and its own literary traditions, and I would cite Flannery O’Connor, or Robert Penn Warren, or Cormac McCarthy, and then William Blake, as well as many French Symbolist and German Expressionist poets, as my antecedents, almost more than anyone from US pulp magazines from ca. 1870-1935. I’m doing my own thing, and have my own designs.

As an example, and as far as the Southern Gothic angle goes, my first, out of print, collection of poetry, DESTRUCTION: TEXT I, was spurred on by my grandmother’s death in Clarksville, Tennessee. She died from emphysema and end-stage COPD. She had run marathons, but she also refused to give up smoking to her last days in her 70s and early 80s. I’m bringing this up with reference to your question about whether the writing process has been difficult for me. In fact, it has been difficult, very difficult. My grandmother’s vices did her in. Marlboro Lite 100s, cartons of them, gold metallic and white cartons of them everywhere. She died painfully. David Letterman had an old joke that the best Christmas gift you could give someone in the Midwest was a carton of cigarettes and a set of tires. That’s my family in a nutshell, but way more Southern; just throw in a pecan pie, and you’d be their hero. Ventilators couldn’t keep my grandmother alive after decades of smoking. She suffocated to death. Her death upset me greatly.

That she was an enthusiastic supporter of my early writing made me realize I had to get to work on writing before I died, too. Otherwise, I don’t think I would have tried to compile any of my own poems, ever. My grandmother’s longstanding belief in my own literary worthiness impacted me greatly, and she was a catalyst. She was a great woman. She helped raise me when my dad abandoned my mom and I. She pushed me to write, and I still miss her.

What or where do you find inspiration for your poetry?

My inclinations, as a reader, have tended toward fellow Southern Gothic writer Edgar Allan Poe, and New Englander HP Lovecraft, and European Dark Romanticist poetry, and the greatest living prose writer of the Gothic tradition, Thomas Ligotti. Gottfried Benn. This is all no secret. These things can’t help but influence you as a writer, if this is the sort of stuff you like to read. My book THIRTEEN NOCTURNES, which I recently learned was nominated for an Elgin Award, has some similar “Southern Gothic” roots. I wrote the lion’s share of Thirteen Nocturnes in a hotel room in Texas that I shared with my partner under terrible circumstances.
To elaborate, in our hotel room, my partner had a black cat named Demon; and I consider Demon to be the co-author of Thirteen Nocturnes, by the way. Demon was a gorgeously sleek black cat who stayed up with me all night, next to me, while I tapped away on the keyboard to make Thirteen Nocturnes happen. I have photos of him standing on my keyboard, even, interrupting my writing to be petted. Demon recently passed away (March, 2020), and his death has profoundly affected me. Folks that are not ailurophiles might find this to be corny — but Demon’s recent death sent me into an incredibly pronounced state of depression. In fact, Demon’s death still upsets me. Demon deserves a whole book to himself. Demon was never “just a cat.”

In fact, the back story of Thirteen Nocturnes and its composition in that Texas hotel room gets even worse. The whole reason me and my partner were in the hotel room was because our house had flooded due to some busted plumbing. Tree roots had grown into the house’s pipes, it turns out. My partner’s elderly mother had been living with us; my partner’s mother was in her 70s and was seriously handicapped. She was not mobile. When the plumbing busted it resulting in the house flooding, and we all had to move out — humans, cats, and dogs. My partner’s mom went to Shreveport, Louisiana, where she had relatives. (Medcaid in Louisiana ended up being far more generous for her care than Medicaid in Texas — no surprise to me). My partner and I had to move  into a hotel room in North Texas for two and half months. That’s when and where I wrote most of Thirteen Nocturnes, in that Texas hotel room with Demon, the cat.

My partner’s mother died shortly thereafter. She passed away in the nursing home in Shreveport, Louisiana while we were still living in the hotel, also from pulmonary problems. This is why Thirteen Nocturnes is dedicated, in part, to my partner’s mom. Demon, the black cat, also passed away, 18 months later. I thanked Demon for letting me be a part of his life as he passed away on a veterinary table in Dallas, Texas in March, 2020. My partner’s mother’s passing was a great influence on my writing then, and it still weighs heavy on my mind. Thirteen Nocturnes was born amid a backdrop of family cataclysm, displacement, instability, death. But that’s been most of my life.

As well, my daily struggles with “Chronic Depression – Severe – Recurrent,” to quote my own medical charts — that’s no doubt some sort of impetus or inspiration. Recently, I’ve grappled with seizures and convulsions and I had an MRI to see what’s going on in my brain. I’ve had visions and hallucinations. In the past I think poets called these kinds of things “reveries.”
Otherwise, I wish I knew a clear answer to what definitely provides “eureka!” moments of inspiration. If I did know, I’d focus on it and I’d always go there to write endless poetry.
I do remember driving in my old car under the Texas sun thinking to myself that I couldn’t wait for Summer to be over. “Summer is something to suffer through…” I thought. And I liked the consonance of that line that had just strangely popped up in my head. It just stuck with me. That became the origin of Nocturne No. 9: “Summer is something to suffer through / From May until September / Suffering Summer is what you do / Until comes grey November.” And it’s true in Texas — thanks to global warming, until November you can have temperatures in the 90s. But the rest of that poem takes a darker turn. Another poem might have been inspired by a dream, or a nightmare. And some of my poems have been inspired by surreal snatches of conversations I’ve overheard.
“Nocturne No. 4” is another — it’s a very simple, short and sweet, rhyming, Gothic poem. I came up with that one after I discovered the world of Instagram poets and wanted to make a short and sweet dark poem to participate in that world. I wrote that poem in 2 minutes. And that poem is many folks’ favorite poem of mine!

So, I wish there was one answer. We’d all be successful poets if we knew what always inspired us to make something worthwhile. It’s not easy. It’s mysterious. You’re a poet, and I’d love to dialogue with you about your inspiration for poetry. My guess is each poem has a different backstory.  For me it’s always elusive.

The literary world often feels, for readers, overly saturated, with the modern accessibility to so much and so many publishing now; what do you believe sets you apart from the rest?

That’s for readers to decide.

I know what I am trying to achieve as a writer. If there’s anything that sets me apart, it’s my intent, and I’m still trying to make my intent evident. I have a very specific goal and worldview; and within that all my poems fall. William Blake and certain other experiences — not poetry, but experiences — have been a guide for me. My poems sketch out a full cosmogony of pain. My next book, NINE BURNING VISIONS, will make this all more plainly evident.

The Bronte Sisters composed all their early poems so that they were situated in a certain parallel world, a “paracosm,” that they called Gondal. Likewise, my poems take place in a paracosm that maps onto our own existing universe, and which explains it; and I think my poems reveal a terrible under-dimension that exists and undergirds our own world. I’m taking poetic license to expand the definition of “paracosm,” in the sense the Bronte Sisters might have meant it, to call my world The Paracosm (capitalized), or The Grand Catallaxy, another term I’ll explain later. The extreme experiences of pain and trauma I’ve had — what Georges Bataille or Michel Foucualt might have called limit-experiences — this is the Universe (or, more specifically, The Bulk, within which string theory operates) within which all my poems exist. The Paracosm / The Grand Catallaxy maps onto our own world and crosses over or onto our own world, and helps explain it, especially the sheer trauma of existence and the misery that seems so prevalent. William Blake has been a guide for me. This may be my unique contribution to Western literature. I do feel I have something unique to contribute.

But this will all come out in the wash, in a few years to come. It’s for readers and critics to decide this.

You’ve written about music, art, and culture for companies like Post-Punk magazine and CVLT Nation; how has the experience been for you? Do you enjoy it?

I’ve always enjoyed music. Poetry and music are primal blood-relatives. Prosody borrows so many terms from the world of music theory, and the primal roots of Western poetry and the meter/metrics of poetry have to do with Greek dance and music. It’s not even a matter of “borrowing”; music and poetry are the same in their origins. Poetic forms like odes, sonnets, and ballads all borrow from music.

In fact, the stresses of words in Western prosody were supposed to coincide with footfalls of Greek dance; hence the poetic term “a metrical foot.” That is, when the foot was to rise in a primordial Greek dance, it is unstressed in the corresponding syllable; the foot falling down is where the heavy stress lay in the syllable. This barely matters any more, except maybe intuitively, to English speakers in 2020. Regional diction, slang, the normal development of the language over centuries, etc etc changes it all.  I love music and always will, as most poets have. But the primal connection of music and poetry is still there. Schopenhauer and others said the only escape from worldly pain is the aesthetic contemplation of the sublime, such as what music offers, when one is thrown into a reverie because of the beauty on display. I largely agree with that, except I think limit-experiences also play a role: extremities of physical sensation (sex, pain) or intellectual experiences (contemplation of nature, space, theoretical physics).  Poetry has the same effect on me as music. It’s a rare type of bliss.

Having said all this, I do still sometimes write about postpunk and punk and goth. I enjoy Killing Joke’s “Love Like Blood” like I enjoy Berlioz’ “Dream of a Witches’ Sabbath” or Shostakovich’s “Symphony No. 7 in C major, Op. 60” — “The Siege of Leningrad.” I think since the advent of Western pop music in the late 1940s or the 1950s, Killing Joke have done everything. They’re the first and last pop band since the 1970s, until now, as far as I am concerned! They’re all you need to know. They’ve mastered every style of post-1973 music. It doesn’t hurt that their singer, Jaz Coleman, is a genius.

Besides the writing part of your life, you’re the founder of two events in Texas, Wardance and Funeral Parade. What motivated you to start them? What can someone wanting to attend expect?

Wardance in Dallas was obviously named after the Killing Joke song of the same name. Funeral Parade, in Austin, Texas, I named after my love of that release (the “Funeral Parade” EP) by the old 80s cult UK deathrock band Part 1. Funeral Parade, as an event, is now on indefinite hiatus. Wardance is now a “Wardance presents” thing. My focus now is the monthly Ceremony club night at The Nines in Deep Ellum in Dallas. Since the Covid-19 lockdown, this has all been thrown awry. I still write for Post-punk.com. My focus is now mostly on poetry and writing.

With all that you have going on and all that you’re doing, what does a typical day look like for you? How do you keep motivated?

There’s no typical day for me. Most of my days are spent dealing with therapists, psychiatrists, or trying to read and write. Recently I’ve been treated for seizures, so my typical day has changed. I’ve been undergoing Electro-Convulsive Therapy at UT Southwestern, so that has changed my routine. Ask me this question 3 months from now, and things will have changed again. I’m hoping the ECT therapy will make me more functional.

Is there anything you’d like to say? Anything you’d want to promote?

Be on the lookout for Nine Burning Visions, my follow up to Thirteen Nocturnes, soon. I have created a cosmogony  — The Paracosm/The Grand Catallaxy  —  within which everything falls, and which maps onto our own world, although it is in many ways separate. My poems sketch out a full cosmogony of pain. In Nine Burning Visions it’ll be fleshed out in the context of a suite of interconnected poems. Go to http://oliversheppard.net to keep up to date.

Musically, check out http://ceremonydallas.com to see what I’m up to with musical events. I’m doing some things with my friends in the band Rosegarden Funeral Party and a few DJ friends (Per Nilsson of Awen, Puncture, and a dj at Dallas’s The Church) there. We may be doing some livestreaming stuff soon.

Check him out more here:

Website: http://oliversheppard.net
Ceremony Dallas: http://ceremonydallas.com


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Bachman: When did you realize you were a writer?

Sowder: Well, I wrote my first story when I was 12, but didn’t really get into writing till I was 15. That was when I started the Executioner Trilogy. I’ve been writing ever since.

Bachman: While running a publishing company, how do you find time to write?

Sowder: I have special time set aside each night to handle stuff for my press and then write. I also have a day job that takes up 40 hours a week so this is the only way I can get things done.

Bachman: What can you tell us about your publishing company Burning Willow Press, for those that may be interested?

Sowder: My publishing company is named Burning Willow Press, We are very interested in publishing science fiction, horror, and fantasy and we are open for submissions. Our website iswww.burningwillowpressllc.com

Bachman: Can you share a little morsel about your latest release?

Sowder: My latest release as an author is “Pain-Killer: A Miss Hyde Novella Volume 2” and I have to say there is a scene in it that I really love but don’t think I should share since it’s more for an 18+ audience. But here is a small piece from another section:

Sowder: I sat down on a bar stool and spun towards the bartender, who was already staring at me in anticipation of my drink order. He wasn’t the regular bartender that was there when I came with Lauren. He was brand spanking new and you could tell. His chocolate brown eyes were still shining with excitement. That would disappear within the week.

“What can I get ya’?” he asked as I watched his eyes sparkle. His face was gorgeous, all harsh lines until you reached a full mouth. It was just full enough to still be considered manly. His chin even had a small dimple that I wouldn’t have noticed if I wasn’t staring at him so intently.

“Dealer’s choice. Just no beer.” As soon as I said the word beer I felt my face scrunch up in disgust, causing my brows to furrow. He nodded and went to work on my drink, but I didn’t watch him make it. I turned away to watch the dancers some more and got bored quickly, knowing that if I had just watched the bartender I would be having a better time. I swiveled on the bar stool to look at him again and as soon as my eyes met his he was sliding a drink in a martini glass over to me, it’s pink liquid barely moving as he slid a napkin underneath it with caution.

“And a cosmopolitan for the lady. If you haven’t had them before you’ll love it. Some women even say they feel like Carrie from Sex and the City when they do.” His lips widened into a smile and I couldn’t help but smile politely back. My fingers slipped over the thin stem of the glass and I lifted it into the air, making a highly informal dedication out of it.

“To Carrie, then.”

Bachman: Where do you find your most inspiration coming from for stories?

Sowder: Everywhere, mostly. I did do a recent post for Gabrielle Faust’s blog where I talked about about what inspired me and my work, focusing on the Miss Hyde Novellas and the Executioner Trilogy. The Miss Hyde Novellas were inspired by my love for Stevenson’s work and I wanted to give it a twist. I think I did just that.

Bachman: If you could work with a dream team, consisting of anyone dead or alive, who would it be and why?

Sowder: I would love to work with Laurel K. Hamilton and Stephen King, mostly Stephen King. I’ve been compared to him on more than one occasion so it would be inter sting to see what we could come up with.

Bachman: What has been your favorite memory in your writing/publishing career so far?

Sowder: My favorite memory? Well, there is nothing like the thrill of holding your first published book in your hands. When “Follow the Ashes” came out and I got my copies I was thrilled and

didn’t want to put it down.

Bachman: I read that you’ve been compared to Anne Rice! How do that feel?

Sowder: That feels amazing! As an author and one that does write vampires it is a huge honor.

Bachman: In the spirit of Halloween, have you had anything frightful happen to you? Either at an event or something that inspired a story share please, with us.

Sowder: I will not go into too much detail, but a short story that I just finished and submitted to an anthology is inspired by a true life event. Hoping that “The Deliverance of Desiree Tanner” will help others like writing it helped me.

Bachman: I recently came across a video that you did that talked about how you caught the writing bug at a young age, for a middle school assignment, that’s amazing! Are there any other things you wrote about at a young age that never made it to publishing?

Sowder: Pretty much the only thing that hasn’t seen the light of day was that original story “Mommy Dearest” that I spoke about in that video. It was read aloud in class, but that’s about it. I have thought about resurrecting it.

Bachman: Where can we see you in the final months of 2015?

Sowder: I don’t have any events planned for the rest of the year, but you never know. I am trying to schedule book signings and interviews so you may see me out and about. For new on me you can subscribe to my newsletter at www.ksowderauthor.com

Bachman: Anything you’d like to promote?

Sowder: Well, All of my work of course, plus BWP releases. We have some amazing stuff out and some more amazing things coming in the next year!

Make sure to check out Burning Willow Press’ Release Party event! October 31st, 2015 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm. Go to the event location.

Some links contained in the above interview may no longer work properly. Images may have been lost over the years as well for some interviews and older content.

This is an older interview being re-posted.


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For most of my career one name kept popping up Katie Salidas. Eventually, my curiosity led me to her and the Spilling Ink crew. On the recommendation and encouragement of others I have appeared on this show, but before that all I knew was Katie was one of the ‘big wigs’ of indie. I’ve since learned so much about this fantastic woman that I approached her for an interview, even admitted to her that I was nervous to do so, but she agreed.

This back and forth led to the following interview to take place. With that, let me introduce to you Katie Salidas, the intelligent go-getting hardworking multi-tasking Queen of Indie Podcasting!


You’re one of the biggest names in podcasting with being a part of the show Spilling Ink. It’s a must-be-on show for anyone in publishing to appear on, but what was life like for you before the show? How did the show begin?

I’m blushing, really. Such high praise. I’m so happy to see Spilling Ink has come so far. It began as a conversation between myself and another indie author during a convention we both attended. All the “talking shop” between talking to our customers got us thinking. We should explore the “behind the scenes” of what it means to be an author, in an open and honest format. Something casual and fun. And so Spilling Ink began. Our mission was just that, “Go behind the book to meet the authors and professionals in the publishing industry.” We didn’t want it to be just an interview show, we really wanted to get a conversation going. Learn the trials and tribulations that each author went through to get their book published. And over the last three years, even though hosts have rotated in and out, I think we’ve accomplished that goal. It’s my favorite hour of the week. I love running the show because each time we bring a new guest on, it’s like making a new friend.

Is doing a popular show difficult to manage with you also being a novelist?

In the beginning the show was much more labor-intensive, we heavily edited shows to make them as perfect as we possibly could. That took a lot of time and often pushed back our release schedule as me and my co-hosts had so many other things we were working on. Well, if you’ve ever heard the saying, “perfect is the enemy of done,” you know what I’m about to say…. After a while we thought about our goal “going behind the book… meeting the authors…,” and realized that we were overdoing it.  Once we switched to a live platform the show became much more manageable. And really, if we are trying to present the real people behind the book, it should be as natural and unedited as possible. With that format we were able to have a regular schedule and that lead us to being able to book more authors. We partner with many publicists to help us fill the seats, and the regularity of our broadcast make it better for our audience and hosts as well. That left us all with more time to work on our other projects, like… writing!

Where do you find your inspiration?

Inspiration comes from life. Everything has the opportunity to be inspiring. Sometimes my kids being kids provides inspiration for characters making mistakes and learning lessons from them. The old adage, “write what you know” applies to more than just the skills you have, it goes into everything you see and do. And if you’re looking for it, you can find the inspiration you need.

Anything you can share about a top-secret project you may have going?

Right now I’m working on Agents of ASSET, book 5. I love living, or rather, escaping to that world. A place where magic exists and the Anonymous Supernatural Security and Elimination Taskforce are working hard to make sure that humans are safe. I know we authors are not supposed to say this, but I always feel like my favorite book is the one I am currently writing. Shhhhh, don’t tell my other books.

There are a few people I come across and I wonder how are they doing so much, what is their life daily look like, and you are one of those few. So, how are you doing everything? Coffee? Doppelganger?

Oh what I wouldn’t give to have a doppelganger. I don’t know the meaning of the word balance, so I’m always overbooking myself with things to do. Between being mom, especially now during quarantine where I’m also moonlighting as the kids’ home-school teacher, and writing, and author coaching, and Spilling Ink… I’ve pretty much forgotten what sleep is like. But every day is an adventure, right? I’ll sleep when I’m dead. Ha!

With all the above, some may not know that you also provide author services that including coaching, when did you begin coach other authors? What are a few of the issues you see being common among authors you’re helping with?

Part of being an indie author is involving yourself with other indies. Self-publishing, though it might imply DIY is rarely a solo thing. Writing may be, but to truly attempt to master the publishing part takes working with the right people, or being guided by the right people. When I started writing and publishing, I had so many wonderful people in the indie community give advice and point me in the right direction, so when I began to figure it out, I wanted to do the same. Over time, the things I could help with grew into various services I could offer. Manuscript critiquing, Developmental editing, Book formatting, walking people through the minefield of publishing with KDP, Ingram, and other platforms. There are so many ways in which authors need a little extra help and there were so many vanity publishing services overcharging authors for the same things I could offer. So I decided to try and strike a balance. Nothing I do is a packaged service. Clients can hire me for only what they need help with. I keep my rates low enough to be affordable for authors and allow me to pay my bills, because I gotta keep the lights on to read those manuscripts.

As for common issues, I really can’t say. Every author needs something different and their stories are as unique as they are.

When you’re not doing web-TV, writing, and helping others what are you doing for you? Any hobbies? 

Writing is my escape. I love diving into the fantasy world with my characters. And when I haven’t been able to write for a while. I get a bit cranky. We all need our escapes, am I right?

It’s so important for creatives to self-care so they don’t burn-out. Do you have any self-care tips?

Sleep. It’s kind of important. Don’t skip sleep. I need to take my own advice. But seriously. Self-care is crucial. You have to take time to replenish. Everyone has their special thing. Do that for yourself, whatever it is, at least once a week. If you don’t take care of you, it will show in your work.

What’s one thing you can share about yourself? Something the masses may not know.

Oh I don’t know if there is anything hidden about me. I am an open book. Maybe that’s the secret. I do suffer from RBF. But aside from that, I’m super friendly and love to meet other authors. That is why Spilling Ink was started, after all!

Come find me online. KatieSalidas.com is my home away from home on the internet and has all the links you need to find me on Social Media, my books, Spilling Ink, and my Author Coaching and Publishing services.

Check her out more here:

First Comics News https://www.firstcomicsnews.com/
Spilling Ink https://www.youtube.com/c/spillinginkshow
Web: http://www.katiesalidas.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/QuixoticKatie
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ksalidas






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I’ve never hid my love of Anne Rice’s work. Reading Interview with the Vampire is what inspired me to try being a writer, taking it more serious. Her words have given me hope to challenge myself and to grow as I grew in my writing, perfecting my skills. I haven’t been truly excited to do a review as I am of this book.

The Vampire Armand is one of my most favorite books. I have re-read books, but this book along with Blood and Gold I’ve sat and read back to back. As if they’re two pieces broken apart that must be completed together. This review will only cover one of the books, obvious with the title.

This book engulfed me, like all of her work always has to me. I have read it many times and it all began when I was a teenager. The story of Armand, like any good life tales, has its ups and downs. From his creation until the end of the piece I felt like I was right there.

Rice has a style that is a testament to her skill. There is a reason she is a legend; why she is a beloved gem. Many have mimicked her, but no one work can ever be just like hers. This book is one of the ones I can for sure say if I had to compare. It reflects on her research, how you’re drawn into the historical elements in a believable way.

I could ramble for ages on her work, this book, get giddy and excited as my former self bubbles up, but I’ll keep it brief. Her work, this book, has been one I’ve recommended for years. I’ll recommend it again.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.