The Blasphemer Series Mythos: The Lost Colony of Roanoke

In the world of The Blasphemer Series, book two Harvest, you’re introduced to the people of The Mythical Realm. Previously, it was known that Sophia Goodwich/Bishop lived there, but the world is expanded upon, and Sophia is brought back to the story. The story explains where the people come from and why they’re in The Mythical Realm. They are from the Colony of Roanoke. It, the book Harvest, explains deeper.


The main reason for me sharing this post is because real facts have come forward that were merely creative writing on my part. I had nothing to do with the real investigation and take no credit on any level for the genetic findings, but I am interested into the credible material that some of the people of the colony inter-mingled/were adopted by the local Native Americans. If you’ve read Harvest already, you will already know why this is interesting to me and maybe even you.


Before writing about the colony, I did refresh my knowledge. I dug through hours of articles and books to prop my creativity upon. Whether this was for inspiration or my usual style of mixing facts and fiction, a twist on history. At the time of my writing of this story the genetics ‘theory’ was not published yet. It only made the most sense to me that they would’ve made peace with locals or even had been adopted in my storyline.


Before I dig into the genetic articles and share them here, I would like to cover what is known. The colony was established by Sir Walter Raleigh in August 1585 (roughly). It was troubled with poor preparation and struggles with the local Native Americans. A trip led by John White occurred in which they returned to England for more supplies, but upon returning to the colony they discovered it was deserted and the word ‘Croatoan’. They believed this meant that they had moved to the Croatoan Island estimated to be fifty miles away. This led them to travel and meet up with the colonists but found none on the island. So, the mystery continued.


Studies have been done, speculations have endured, but no real facts came to the surface of what the colonists may have encountered until a tree was discovered that dated back to this time and was studied. Its rings told of droughts. The theory of the colonists being absorbed into the local Native American population begin to swirl. What is known that the results of the colony being ‘lost’ no doubt affected the colonies that came after as a lesson in preparation and a warning.


Now let’s speak to the genetics that has been discovered. Lost Colony Family DNA Project goal is to identify the ancestors of lost Roanoke colonists through DNA testing in hopes of shedding some light on the old mystery with scientific data. I highly recommend checking out this article entitled The Lost Colony of Roanoke: Did They Survive? – National Geographic, Archaeology, Historical Records and DNA on the DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy website.

Sources & Recommendations:

You can begin reading the series and check out more information by following the link: Down the rabbit hole

What do you think? Let’s start a conversation.

Dark Poetry Submissions Open – Exit Device

I am not organizing this collection of poetry, just helping spread the word of this project for another. Some of you may be familiar with my work with Oliver Sheppard. Exit Device is his mastermind project.


Cover(c)Oliver Sheppard

Project Details:

  • Deadline: September 10th
  • Submit to:exitdevicezine@gmail.com

Words From Oliver:

I hope to get Issue No. 1 out by Halloween. The deadline to submit is September 10th. EXIT DEVICE will be an old school, photocopied, saddle-stapled, black and white DIY zine. It will have no web or social media presence save for the email address above. Right now I cannot afford to pay contributors anything save for contributor’s copies. Looking for dark, weird, bizarre, etc poetry. Avant-garde and experimental stuff is welcome, as is traditional verse. EXIT DEVICE will probably come out once per year.

The name “Exit Device” is from jargon used in the euthanasia/assisted suicide community; the term refers to any mechanism or apparatus that ends its user’s life. The cover image of issue 1 is “Daguerreotype of Nothing” from 1850, an image held by the Getty Museum. I’ve gotten permission from the Getty Museum to use the image for the cover of the zine.

So far, about 20 poems have been accepted. I’ll probably include no more than 50. If you submit and I’ve hit that limit, it may be considered for Issue No. 2.

THIS IS CLOSED NOW