I have only read the first book of the series so this review is just that book and not the series overall. It wouldn’t be fair for me to do that now so far into the challenge, but I felt it important to explain that the following review is just on the first book of the series.

I saw the movie before reading the book, as with many of the books on this year long review challenge. It encouraged my curious brain to find out what the book could have for me and I was so happy that I went down the rabbit hole on this one.

Not only was the story wonderful, but it included along with it something that tapped into my graphic artist side, pictures. Beautiful digital renditions of the characters that really let you see the world within the world. It really engages the reader, at least it did for me.

The story itself was a roller coaster. I really could feel for the characters and was glad to see so many of them embracing their differences and accepting who they are. It’s reflective on real life individuals accepting themselves as this or that. It can be very hard on children and teenagers to come to terms with subjects like this and this book really addressed that. Made the book endearing to me.

I absolutely loved this book!


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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Snow Falling on Cedars is a book I read many years ago. I came across it at a bookstore. I don’t know what came over me when I found it, but I remember feeling drawn to it. It’s not something I normally seek out at a store, but sometimes I find a little gem and take it home.

It is a well-written story about culture and prejudice in 1950s America. A Japanese-American and WWII veteran is accused of murder on an island called San Piedro. The story covers three days of the man’s trial during the wintertime. The story itself is very good and is well-written, but at times I had to force myself to read it, but was glad I did.

I really enjoyed the story despite the very, almost overly, descriptive nature it had at moments. As a writer I try not to be too hard on other writers. I understand sometimes you have to go into great detail for some items, objects, or even characters because it serves a greater service to the reader or even the story itself.

It’s a good read. Great building of suspense. You can learn a lot about the historical time period it is set because the author really did great research to create such a beautifully depicted setting. I know this only because I sometimes get curious about things I’m reading and conduct my own research and the author is accurate from what I can tell.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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The copy of this book that I own is considered ‘the poor man’s version’ of the original that is held in Ireland, I hope to see them one day. For those unaware of what this book is it is a religious text originally in Latin containing the four gospels. My edition has beautiful illustrations, like the original.

I came into owning this book as it was gifted to me, in a big lot of books from a mentor of mine. Many of the books I’ve for the website reviewed came to me in this big lot of gifted books and I’m in the future going to receive more (as I’ve been informed recently). I have only been gifted so many books by my mentor in their words, ‘because of the care I take of my books’. Due to this reason and this book being among the collection I treasure it.

Upon digging into the pages I became aware more so of its importance. Its original creators of The Book of Kells were monks in a town called Kells. They created illustrations to aid in the explanation of many scenes and figures from The Bible. It may not be for everyone due to its subject matter, but for a independent religion student like myself it may provide some valuable information.

Meehan, the author of this edition, provides beautiful explanations on the illustrations and what he believes them to mean. The art is very delicately created and very detailed. He points out interesting metaphors that lie within the imagery. It is said that the art must’ve been created by angels because it is considered so beautiful. The book contains information about the monks that created the illustrations and their lives day to day. I’ve seen documentaries since reading this book that helped me better understand the monk’s lives better, the history better, and what scholars feel about the original book.

Highly recommend for those that are interested in history or Biblical history. Again, this is not the original book of The Book of Kells, but a version that covers the original and helps those interested understand better. I also recommend those interested to do their own research.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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All proceeds from this book sale will go to the charity group Feed the Movement, a Charlotte, NC based “small group of individuals based in Charlotte who provide hot meals, snacks, and drinks to all our people fighting for justice.” You can find them on Facebook at Feed the Movement CLT if you want to learn more about them.

Echoes drift not just backwards, but forwards as well.

Following the funeral of her husband, Yvonne takes a walk as she reflects on her life, her decisions, her joys and sorrows, and her legacy. Like echoes across the water, each step causes a ripple, moving forward and back but always changing, and diminishing.

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This is a very short story, less than thirty pages. It’s a quick read and recommended for those with some time to spare. The version I read is just the short story, I have discovered there is a version with the same title that has multiple short stories in it by Irving. I haven’t read the collection of shorts just the short story and with that said this review is only of the story.

Sleepy Hollow is a small town best described in the story itself:

A pleasing land of drowsy head it was,
Of dreams that wave before the half-shut eye;
And of gay castles in the clouds that pass,
Forever flushing round a summer sky.
CASTLE OF INDOLENCE.

This town, though sleepy, is full of legends and tales. A school teacher named Ichabod Crane is one of the residents that is most obsessed with these stories. He’s described as a bit of a softhearted foolish nerd and definitely not the most handsome of characters. He is in love with one of the more beautiful women,Katrina, of the town, but she’s spoken for by a man named Brom Bones.

One of the more famous legends in the the town is of the specter of a Hessian trooper that lost his head ‘when a cannonball carried it away’ and can still be seen riding his horse around the town at night looking for his head. Crane finds himself apart of this legend as he is chased down by the ghost one night and is never heard of again.

This is a classic Halloween tale, one I’ve read to my own child. It’s timeless and wonderfully written. Highly recommend for any time of the year. Not often does a story really make me wanna live in it, but the town seems so romantically gothic in its description.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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This is one of the several biographies on Edgar Cayce you can find on the market. I read this a few years back. I became interested in Mr. Cayce after watching a documentary about him. This may not be a book for everyone, it’s a biography and deals with psychic abilities. The title of the book comes from what Edgar Cayce became known for, his method of trance in which he made his prophecies.

Cayce accurately the death of John F. Kennedy, two world wars (including the years they began and ended), racial strife in America, and hundreds of other recorded events. He was also able to ‘travel time and space to treat the ill’. Doing this he was able to give accurate information that led to a number of cures when traditional medicine at that time wasn’t advanced enough. He also was the first on record to introduce Americans to the concept of reincarnation. If I remember correctly he even predicted he would be reborn in the year 2020 because of a great awakening would be occurring.

I have loved learning about this man and his life, this book taught me a lot about him. It’s interesting to reflect back on when he was doing his work and all the things he predicted, even now as I write this I can’t help think of some of his predictions. I’m usually a skeptic with things, but even I have a hard time denying some things I learned in this book after all I’ve learned, even heard of his recordings.

Highly recommend if someone is interested in learning about Edgar Cayce. Great for entertainment purposes.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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I don’t think I’m alone when I say I avoided reading this book for a long time because of the sheer size of it. I read this book later in high school, but paused to only finish it years later during my college years. It wasn’t any type of assigned reading I wanted to read it to say that I had because everyone seems familiar with it being one of the thickest books out there, alone with War and Peace, and even considered a ‘boring book’ and that it’s an achievement to finish it.

The story itself is basically about a man that has gone crazy chasing after a whale he lost his leg to on a past voyage. Ahab, the whaler after the sperm whale, is often described as monomaniacal (psychosis characterized by thoughts confined to one idea or group of ideas) which is one of my favorite words ever, but I digress. Ahab’s obsession on the whale that took his leg is the main item that pushes the story forward you also can see how Ahab is frustrated and saddened by his madness, he wishes to be free of this obsession.

There are plenty of beautiful metaphors which are done in such a way that gives credit to the author’s ability to tell a good story. It is a well written story, just a long one. Not recommended, ever, by anyone that wants a quick read or a beach book.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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Originally, I had wrote this long beautiful review of this story, but accidentally saved over it. I will try to recreate that review to the best of my knowledge and a new cup of coffee to help me refocus myself. Now, let’s get to the review.

I have read many of Lovecraft’s catalog. His writing is a dense/thick style which makes it difficult at times for the average reader to consume, this story is no different. Once you get use to it, the style, is completely engulfing. Though The Dunwich Horror is not my favorite of his works, it made it into the top five because it contains the elements of horror I really enjoy.

A boy, Wilbur, is born to an unstable albino mother. He is different as he grows very quickly. During the years of his growing up his grandfather teaches him of witchcraft and dark rituals. The family is shunned by the town’s folk for their odd behaviors and their foul smells. Even animals fear them.

When he becomes a man (by the time he should be an average ten year old little boy) his grandfather has him helping him in their farmhouse to summon and entrap an invisible monster. As the monster grows it becomes harder to control and Wilbur seeks a copy of a book called Necronomicon in order to find a way to do just that.

While Wilbur does find the location of one he is denied. He breaks in a steals a copy from the library housing it, but ultimately ends up dead trying to escape with it. Due to his passing the monster becomes completely uncontrollable and breaks free of the house that had been holding him. It rampages the town. The people only realize something is there because of the damage and the ‘prints’ the monster leaves behind. Near the end of the story it is stopped and revealed to be the twin brother of Wilbur. It calls out for its father, Yog-Sothoth.

Since I have read many of Lovecraft’s work since, I have learned that Yog-Sothoth is apart of the Cthulhu Mythos. It is first mentioned in the story The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. As to what it really is is at least hinted at in the story Through the Gates of the Silver Key, in which it is described to have a connection with all time and space. It is in this story, The Dunwich Horror, that you can connect the dots and see the connection to ‘The Old Ones’.

I had many assumptions about the story. It was one of the earlier works of Lovecraft I read and all the horror stories I’ve read had me predicting the twists and the storyline, but I was pleasantly surprised and have learned since not to assume anything when it comes to Lovecraft.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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Ramona Mainstrom is one fantastic writer covering several genres and bringing forward a multitude of books. This interesting author gave me some of her time earlier this year. I gathered a list of questions and she was kind enough to answer them, below is the interaction. This is not a interview to skip over!


Tell us a little about yourself.

I’m a full-time author and solo parent of two kids, ages 7 & 8. I enjoy acting and singing. I’m often dancing around the house and enjoy puttering around the garden with my neighbour.

What genre (s) do you write in?

Fantasy (Urban, Epic, and Dark), Thriller, and Horror.

For most, they began writing at a young age, taking writing more seriously later in life. Is this a sentiment that can apply to you? What was it like for you?

I was discouraged from writing or reading for pleasure, so becoming a writer wasn’t an option in my reality for a while. It was rough. I don’t know how to explain how having a part of your Self forbidden.

I was a story-teller as a child and as soon as I learned how to write words, I started writing stories. In high school, I wrote short stories, poems, scripts and started a few longer stories.

I didn’t consider writing as a career option until I was an adult and only because of peer pressure. Friends got a hold of some of my scenes and short stories and insisted I finish them. That’s how I started writing the Touch of Insanity series, but Eyes of the Hunter was the first stand alone book I completed.

How much time do you spend writing?

No clue. I’m a bit of a workaholic, but I’m also a multi-tasker. So, I’ll be at my desk for hours, but I’ll be writing a book, answering messages, homeschooling my kids, doing groceries online, and editing a different book.

 I just flow. If I start to stress about when, how long, or how many words, it kills the joy and creativity. I don’t put pressure on myself for deadlines or word counts. I need writing to be enjoyable. I need the words to flow naturally, so I let it happen when and how it wants while I go about taking care of the rest of my day.

What has been the most eye-opening part of publishing for you?

At the beginning, it was learning how traditional publishing works. It was very discouraging. Being an indie author taught me so much, but I think it also made me a better client once I was with a publisher.

Do you have a favorite character that you have written? If so, who? And what makes them so special.

Hands down; Santa in Sleigh Ride. Taking this epitome of kindness and generosity and giving him a hard edge made him more lovable to me. He’s avenging the benign creatures under his care who were injured or killed by dark forces. He’s racing, for not just his own life, but to preserve the beauty of Christmas and everyone who works with him.

Pitting him against the older, harsher Christmas representations in a death race let me show a dark and ruthless side of Santa. There’s a point in the story where his co-pilot, Jack Frost says, “People will get hurt” and Santa replies, “I’m counting on it.”

That gives me the chills. Every. Time. Santa is going to mess folk up to protect his people and keep the spirit of Christmas alive. He’s selling his soul for others to have that magic.

Do you ever write traits or characters inspired by people you know?

Always! It’s how I keep my characters real. Would so-and-so do this? How would they react? What’s their speech pattern like?

Where do your ideas come from?

Everything. Everywhere. There are a million stories in my world every day. People are lovely inspirations. Beautiful, complex, predictable yet chaotically unpredictable in all their messy glory.

 Real life is a non-stop Plot Bunny that just keeps popping out babies. For years, I was told I should write about my life because it’s so wild. But, as fiction because no one would believe it really happened. So I’ve started using bits of my personal life into my stories. The Crossroad is actually a journal entry from my life. It was intended to be part of a non-fiction series, but . . . Well, a good paranormal story is fun to read.

 And, my other big inspiration is dreams. My dreams and nightmares are detailed and emotion-filled. They stay with me long after I wake and often inspire my stories. The Greatest of Books is a story based on my dreams.

What is your current writing about?

I’m currently releasing the Touch of Insanity series. It’s a 10 book fantasy series about a Half-Elf named Kharee, who was created to heal a goddess who is going mad and is spreading insanity via her connection to the people of the world, Besamie. Unfortunately, her parents withheld the ability for her to actually use her powers until they knew she’d grown up to be a decent, sane person.

The series follows Kharee as she discovers her powers, her mission, and her own truth. I’ve tried to keep the story as PG as possible, but she goes through some dark and gruesome experiences as she wades through the madness. For example, there are winged monsters called karpa that impregnate their prey and werewolves which are called Hydan Kin in their world, named after Hydan Speargood, the Elven Mage-Master who first contracted the magical disease. Oh, and of course a vampire lord, because no dark fantasy is complete without one.

I’ve been releasing a new book every 20th. Book 4, Each According Their Worth, releases on April 20th and I’m hoping to have a completed collection of all 10 books in one out in time for Christmas. If readers want to know when each book releases, they can sign up for Books2Read notifications .

It’s been very exciting to write and I’m so proud of the finish products.

Do you have any new series planned?

After the Touch of Insanity series, Three Furies Press will be releasing the Harper series. It’s a paranormal thriller about a psychic named Hannah Harper who has PTSD. She’s very quirky. Edges frighten her, so everything in her home is rounded. Going out is challenging because there are edges everywhere. She gets dragged into an investigation of serial killings and finds the guy, but ends up as his next target. As the series progresses, they discover the killer from the first book isn’t the only threat they have to worry about. I’m very excited about this series because it sneaks from “okay this is a paranormal story” to “OhEmGee! This is mind-bending paranormal and I’m scared now”. Or, it will be if I do it right.

What has being signed to a publisher meant for you as a writer, since many self-publish nowadays?

It was surprisingly cathartic. I’d given up on the idea of being picked up by a publisher and was content self-publishing. I really respect the women running Three Furies Press, so when I saw they were accepting submission and I actually had something in a genre they publish, I just had to submit Gifted, the first book of the Harper series.

Reading that I’d been accepted . . . I cried. Happy, ugly cry because people I respect  found value in my work.

What are you reading now?

I’m currently reading really interesting urban fantasy by Yvette Bostic, called Call of the Elements, which is the first book of her Magister’s Bane series. It’s really good.

About Rosa

Rosa Marchisella is a prolific author and the creator of the animated series, Zomb-Eh? Rosa also writes non-fiction under the name Rosa Arcade. She has written and co-authored over 50 publications, stories, screenplays, and scripts. Her poetry has been featured in anthologies and websites. Her other written works include 200+ articles, marketing and media projects, as well as promotional and educational tools.

Social Media Links

Website:                     www.RosaMarchisella.com

Facebook:                  www.facebook.com/iamrosa.fanpage

BookBub:                   www.bookbub.com/authors/rosa-marchisella

Books2Read:             https://books2read.com/ap/8Z2MY8/Rosa-Marchisella


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