I absolutely loved the movie. The book followed after the movie, as happens sometimes. I was pleasantly surprised this is one of the rare occasions that the book and the movie are both exceptional.

I liked very much the fact that the main character, Ignatius, wasn’t a ‘perfect stereotype’ of a guy becoming a demon. I read all too often that a guy changes and is instantly a know everything of the powers they have gained or is an insta-badass. This is so very much not the case. He is a regular guy and isn’t fully understanding his powers as they progress, he is losing battles, in my opinion because he doesn’t fully understand his powers or strengths he has gained.

This isn’t a scary horror book, but more of a humorous one. I normally don’t like horror-comedies personally, but this one got a chuckle out of me here and there. It also had a soul to it, the story. It’s so sad at times. To me, it’s a really good story about how people assume to know you and how assumptions can consume a town and those closest to a person. One mistake can literally damn you.

I recommend reading the book if you’ve seen the movie or vice versa, but not definitely not for everyone. There is sacrilegious behavior throughout the book. There is a horror-comedy aspect to it that genre purist may not like, it’s never completely horror or completely comedy. There are thriller/mystery aspects that occur due to the writing, but the writing is very well done.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

Set in the 17th century this is an interesting tale. I’m a fan of reading history and historical pieces. This story, as far as I know, is purely fiction set at a time when being a good Puritan was important. Hester, the main character, is labeled with the letter ‘a’ for adultery to tell the those that come in contact with her she is a sinner and what ‘type of person she is’. She gives birth to a baby and refuses to explain who the father is. She could’ve easily lied many times to easy the prejudices and hatred she was facing saying that the father was her husband’s, but she didn’t. She didn’t bow to the pressure of the colony she lived within.

Many times throughout it I fully expected this to turn into a Satanic witch twist as that was commonplace of the period and wasn’t let down, there are characters referred to being associated with the devil or an associate of the devil, but it isn’t the main character.

I came into this book with a lot of judgement. I knew many had read it in high school, but I don’t remember ever being forced to. I can easily see this being one of those books for many where they have to eat it in smaller portions. It can even be considered ‘dry’ at moments. It’s well written and interesting, at least for me, when I got going.

I admit this isn’t a newer read for me, I read this book many years ago, but it left enough of an impression for me to want to review it now. I can see the parallels of the story to how people are treated even today when they’re judged by family and friends for being ‘sinful’, though the letter isn’t literary it’s still there, labels can hurt and in this story you can see the progress of such an event.

I felt for the main character on multiple occasions. There are hypocrites throughout the story, especially who turns out to be the father of the baby. This goes hand-in-hand with how people treat others and why they do what they do, it’s for selfish reasons. Poor Hester’s baby, it didn’t ask for any of this to happen.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

It was clear to me that this is a moral tale of being careful as Dr. Moreau is basically playing God in his own universe with the main character falling into it. Prendick, the main character, is how many would be, shocked and disturbed by the details of the world he has been thrust into. He is in a literal Hell-scape full of the horrors that a ‘mad scientist’ has created.

This is one of those horror books, for me, that I couldn’t put down. I was aware of the movie and enjoyed it, but as it has said many times before in this series of reviews I wanted to see what was different from the movie and the book.

It follows, of course, the same storytelling, but like good horror it allowed me often to use my imagination and thus scare myself. My heart broke for many of the characters. It’s easy to feel for many of the characters. It’s intriguing and well-written giving prove of Wells’ great writing and why he’s considered a legend.

I don’t recommend this book to anyone that may be a sensitive reader. This is not a book for the faint. Some of the details can be gruesome, shocking, and overwhelming. Wells writes some parts of this story in a raw unabashed detail that could take a less seasoned horror reader off guard. Even though I enjoyed this book I admit time to time there were parts that I was surprised by, but I’m a seasoned reader and writer of horror. I found it refreshing to see an author creating some of the lines of literature that are in this story.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

I’ve never hid my love of Anne Rice’s work. Reading Interview with the Vampire is what inspired me to try being a writer, taking it more serious. Her words have given me hope to challenge myself and to grow as I grew in my writing, perfecting my skills. I haven’t been truly excited to do a review as I am of this book.

The Vampire Armand is one of my most favorite books. I have re-read books, but this book along with Blood and Gold I’ve sat and read back to back. As if they’re two pieces broken apart that must be completed together. This review will only cover one of the books, obvious with the title.

This book engulfed me, like all of her work always has to me. I have read it many times and it all began when I was a teenager. The story of Armand, like any good life tales, has its ups and downs. From his creation until the end of the piece I felt like I was right there.

Rice has a style that is a testament to her skill. There is a reason she is a legend; why she is a beloved gem. Many have mimicked her, but no one work can ever be just like hers. This book is one of the ones I can for sure say if I had to compare. It reflects on her research, how you’re drawn into the historical elements in a believable way.

I could ramble for ages on her work, this book, get giddy and excited as my former self bubbles up, but I’ll keep it brief. Her work, this book, has been one I’ve recommended for years. I’ll recommend it again.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

This book began as a misunderstanding for me. Somewhere some time ago I heard that the author of Forest Gump had wrote the book that became Benjamin Button, this was after the flick’s release. I was curious about the book, as I have mentioned in other reviews, the movie awoke me to the book that inspired it, but it wasn’t for a very long time that I came across the novel and the truth of the authors.

I cannot remember where I heard the misinformation, but of course it was online where misinformation spreads quicker than the truth. When the truth is discovered it’s usually too late and the wrong thing is believed more so. Forest Gump and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button are not by the same author, but the screen adaptations are, Eric R. Roth. So movies yes, books no.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is by F. Scott Fitzgerald. A brilliant storyteller and world creator. This is a unique take of a story line, life moving backward as it progresses forward’. I love the movie, no doubt, and the book is just as wonderful for me.

It took me less time to read it than I was expecting as it’s more of a novella than a full novel. Wonderfully depicted with the way the author carries the story and character’s along in words. Most novellas I can eat in less than two hours, this is just the same. I don’t sit with a timer when I go into a book, I love getting lost in the worlds normally.

Benjamin’s story is a true journey of life and death, trying to do as much as one can in the span of a lifetime. The highs and lows a life can have. Near the end my heart was broken. It can easily remind one of how life is so much shorter than the immortal youths can be led to believe. Life will continue on whether we want it to or not.

The truly timeless thing of all is time itself, it cares not for those living.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

The edition of this narrative poem I own, lucky has an English translation included. This is how I’ve been able to read it. I found it very interesting to see the story in the original German as well. It was titillating for me to see the words in both languages, German is not a language I am fluent in.

This is a book I’ve read many times and love it more every time I dive in. It’s a ‘go to’ book for me along with any Anne Rice book and any historical book I own. It is one of my favorite books.

I found myself relating to Faust and his want of more knowledge. I love when I can relate to a character in any way, much less the want to know more. This book reminded me of Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy with the settings and traveling to Heaven. Alighieri’s narrative poems are some of my favorite works as well.

The main character’s journey is one of darkness and struggle. I rooted for things to become better for him. Whether they do or not you’ll have to find out for yourself as I rarely do spoilers, I have, but not often.

The English translation is written well and done well, but then again I am just hoping it was translated well.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

Twain’s story came into my life when I was young and still in school. I remember reading it clearly twice, once as part of a textbook and later as a book of its own. I have read it a third time as an adult just to see if the first impressions I had had changed, they did.

At first, this was one of those stories I felt forced to read. I didn’t want to, but found some interest in the characters. I got into the story as it pulled me into the time period it is set, it is a different time with different word usage. By the third time I read it I no longer felt forced which made the material ‘boring’ to me, I was interested in it. I felt for the character Jim every time I read about him, his want to be free, and the way others saw him.

I can see the reasoning for this becoming ‘banned book’ from one’s perspective, but then again I personally don’t believe in banning books at all. I know this is an opinion that is solely mine and not often shared, but felt it important to include in this review. The third time I read this I had already read a book I found in my high school library shelves that in detail taught the reader how to use ‘heroine safely’ and it hadn’t been banned.

The book can be difficult to read with the way its written to capture the accents and slang of the time and place its set in. My review of this book won’t differ much from the thousands of reviews that can be found on it, so no spoilers or anything special to share. I enjoyed the book, it’s a classic, and I recommend reading it.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

I knew about the radio hysteria this book had caused in the past. I tried to ignore my previous knowledge before going in and reading it, when I did. I wanted to be a blank slate, but I couldn’t. I kept asking myself or saying to myself throughout it, ‘I can see why people would’ve gotten upset’ or ‘why would this had scared people’. This was a book I just could go into ignoring what I knew.

This happens at times, sometimes I just can’t ignore my prior knowledge. Whether its from a movie version I can’t help but compare or another outlet giving me a prior impression. I did want to read the book because its a classic and I learned it was different than the radio edition that Orson Welles created.

The story is a great sci-fi tale. It stirred my imagination. It’s well written and easy to read, which is always nice. I don’t often come across material that is difficult for me to understand, I was glad this wasn’t one of those times. It’s interesting to see what the mind can create when it comes to alien invasion stories. I can see why so many have re-done this theme many times. I give full credit to this story as being the inspiration for many other alien stories.

I recommend everyone read this story. Even if its just to say you have or even to experience what has inspired so much. It’s dark and can give the sense of being ‘right there’ along with the characters that isn’t easy for an author to create, but well done by Wells.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

I don’t often read romance. I have in the past, but it’s not a go-to genres unless something special about it has caught my attention. I was given several books some time back that contained a lot of Nora Roberts, who at the time I did not know of. Curious about this new to me writer I wanted to pick of the pile I had of her work something that stood out and The Collector did just that.

Why it stood out to me I am not sure, it was probably a combination of the cover and the back synopsis that got me in the end, but within its pages I found an interesting suspense story. I haven’t read any of her other books I’ve kept, so I can’t really compare her to her other work and because this is one of the few romance stories I’ve read I don’t feel I have much to compare it to in this way.

For me, romance has to happen for a reason. It cannot be forced and cannot be a ‘just ’cause’ type of reason. I didn’t feel that happening in this book. It’s a very well written book, comparing this to other authors I have read. I was left with many questions unanswered. I can only assume this is because I’ve not read much of her work. I have been told that her work makes more sense if I had read more of her work. Perhaps, but sadly I haven’t.

This isn’t a book I’m over the moon about and I’m not going to dismiss either. It’s one of those books that fell in the middle for me. She is an amazing writer, the story was interesting, and all that, but just not my cup of tea.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

I admit, I didn’t read this book until after the movies were all fully released. I was curious about the original books because of the movies. They gripped me so greatly and being such a big fan of books I wanted to see what the books had to say with their voice, what the author’s voice had to say while saying the story.

It is heartbreaking with the life Katniss’ lives. How her father passed and how it forced her into more responsibilities since her mother became depressed. She is strong; I don’t know many that would take a stand like this girl did. She’s not even an adult and able to realize without someone going out and hunting people would die she loves, including herself.

I had many questions, but ultimately realized this is all she knew. This brutal world is all she’s know, Katniss. I felt for her; I wanted her to win.

I got to a certain part in the book, while the children were already murdering each other where I thought of the gladiator games. I couldn’t help but think, “Are they not entertained?” They weren’t. They wouldn’t be fully until one stood above all others.

It’s an emotional rollercoaster of a book. I can see why it was made into a movie. I can see what it’s popular. I can see why so many have loved it despite the morbid factor of children killing each other. That is one thing about books I love. They can take you anywhere. From the magical world of Mr. Potter to the brutality of The Hunger Games.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.