I have to confess, on this list of all the books I’ve reviewed and will, this book is not my own. It was a borrow from my mother, who enjoys biographies. This, like most biographies, covers the highlights of the subject’s life, but also taught me a few new ones. It really digs into Kennedy’s life and shows a side of him I was never taught in school.

It is said that such focus has been on the death of a man that very clearly had so much life before his end. This book covers his illness, even how despite being sick he served active duty in the South Pacific as the captain of PT-109. I wondered time to time if the author tired of writing about the former president or if some lack of detail was purposely chosen to gloss over aspects of his life with some way he writes portions, but either way it didn’t cause me to lose momentum in my reading.

I didn’t expect a book to focus mainly on his passing, but his wife and his time in office mentioned far less than expected compared to other books I’ve read about him. It wasn’t until I was reading more about the book as a product that I learned how much had been left out. I am not sure if some of what I read about is true or not, but it is sad that if he had lost a child with his wife while in office was left out why it was. This isn’t something I knew of before, and if it’s true, I would’ve like to have learned about how he and his wife handled such a terrible loss. It must’ve really hurt Jackie O.

This is a VERY thick book and wasn’t something I could read in one sitting, but over many days. This is how I recommend this book be read. A long-lasting reading, as it is just so large.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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This classic was a suggested read when I was in school. Whether it was an assignment or just a recommendation from my teacher, I can’t remember. This is a beautifully written story of adventure written by Jules Verne. When you take in consideration, the period of which it was written and the other works Verne wrote, you can appreciate the details included on this journey that takes place in the late 1800s.

The journey only happens because of a bet being taken on by the main character, Phileas Fogg and employer of his helper Jean Passepartout. I have seen none of the movie versions of this book so I cannot compare them, but from what I remember Fogg is a mundane character, he’s hard to like as he’s not especially exciting and rigid, despite being well written. I feel this was done on purpose as to not take away but to add to the adventures. What would this person do if confront with a wild adventure? An unexciting person on an exciting adventure.

Recommending based on it’s a classic. Everyone should at least dip their toes into the classic literature books at some point in their life.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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I find myself time to time delving into a biography, usually that of musicians I’ve enjoyed, but sometimes a politician or great mind comes into my possession. This is one of those great mind examples of a biography I thoroughly enjoyed. This is a complete journey into the world and man of Leonardo da Vinci. It contains a lot of information and is one of the heavier books I’ve read. They credit Da Vinci as one of the greatest minds throughout history, and this book is all the proof I needed to confirm that.

They cover everything I knew about him before reading the book within it from the Mona Lisa to his inventions, it’s the best reference guide, if one was to use it that way, on this man. I even learned many newer things. Da Vinci loved horses. 

I recommend this book to those interested in the life of Leonardo da Vinci, but do not recommend it if you’re wanting a quick guide this is not the guide for you. This is a heavy, well-written, but very in-depth biography that starts with da Vinci’s early years and then moves through his life. Isaacson does all the work and all you have to do is read and enjoy, but take your time cause you’re going to need it to get through every word and image included.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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I already posted my review on American Gods by Neil Gaiman, an excellent read, and I recommend it if you haven’t read it yet. When I found out that there was a second edition of the American Gods world I knew I had to buy it and luckily, when I bought my edition of American Gods I also purchased Anansi Boys knowing I’d want to delve into it right after and I did.

I found this book very well written, quick-witted, and even funny with the way the characters speak. Anansi being the character portrayed in the tv show, I expected nothing less from him and Gaiman delivered staying true to the character. It isn’t often I come across something that causes me to laugh out loud, but this book did that for me. I have become a fan of Gaiman’s and love his imagination. You can tell with his writing that he researches and really does the work that it takes to put into a book. This isn’t something thrown together and I am glad that I expect high quality from him. He is truly a legend, and this book really cemented it for me.

The story reads like a twisting adventure with touches of mystery. I loved that I couldn’t predict what was coming and loved the journey it took me on. That’s high praise! 


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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We’re at week 39/40 for book reviews with a goal of 53 this year. Friday a new review will go up as per usual, but I decided before that review to post how I came to the books I have been reviewing. Last year, when the prepping for this year on the website began, I tried something I hadn’t done before, at least not attempted.  I’ve been an avid reader for as long as I can remember. Sometimes, I admit, I didn’t pick up a book or read nothing new, but I had read a lot before and after these periods. I have a tendency to lean toward horror, non-fiction, fantasy, poetry, short story collection, biography, documentary-style, and even philosophical enlightenment sprinkled with religious study genre. I enjoy learning new things and if a book captured any ombre of the above listed; I was hooked. 
From Moby Dick by Herman Melville to Armand by Anne Rice I have already reviewed many… many books so far, but the list which there is one began when I started looking at all the books I had or remember having then shortened the list into what I have read and are still sitting on the shelf or in the kindle to-be-read. I wanted to review books publically that I enjoyed, but also do it honestly. I dislike reviewing things I didn’t like, not wanting to give it attention, but I knew going into this year-long challenge I would appear bias or ‘fake’ if I didn’t mention these types of things. I also knew going in that many of these books were obscure to a younger readership or even considered classics. 
I didn’t want to review just recent publications as this wouldn’t be realistic to me as I didn’t start reading in recent years. The list began with Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and will end with a book by American folklorist Charles Godfrey Leland, according to my list. Alongside the review, I also wanted to share how the book came into my life and share a bit of the book journey on a personal level.
 I hope that this year of reviewing has opened some minds to new books and given insight to the world of reading I have for myself. 


What are your thoughts? Have you enjoyed the reviewing so far this year?


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Despite the belief Hemingway held that talking about writing was bad luck, I am no Hemingway. In fact, talking about writing is one thing I enjoy doing most. Sharing my experiences in the land of literature. I’m in a constant fluid-like state of shifting in attempts to improve my skills and grow as a writer. Before I could get my hands on a copy of this book, I had already flipped through a unique book entitled Stephen King’s On Writing. It is to date one of the few books I’ve ever read by Stephen King. Enjoying what I had read of that book, I wanted to find other books that were similar, authors sharing their expertise in the same field, and that led me to what I thought was the doorway of Hemingway.
The title was misleading a bit; it gave me the impression that it was a book by Hemingway, but it is a book of notes and thoughts by Hemingway and gathered and authored by Larry W. Phillips. It is still a recommendable book on the grounds it gives you insight into a writer, Hemingway, that changed the way English prose is stylistically. I learned a lot from this book on writing. For example, it taught me despite Hemingway’s belief of talking about writing being bad luck he himself in fact talked about it often.
I have enjoyed reading his published works, but the way he talks about writing is beautiful. The way he crafted his sentences and use of metaphors is brilliant in my eyes. I shall share a snippet so those of you whom may have not read this book can see for yourself what I’m talking about better.

Dostoevsky was made by being sent to Siberia. Writers are forged in injustice, as a sword is forged.

Ernest Hemingway on Fyodor Dostoevsky

I recommend this book. In fact, any ‘on writing’ books you can get your hands on read them. They’re a great reference guide and insight into the writer they’re the subject of. 


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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I fell in love with the television show version of this, but as with many books I’ve previously reviewed, I had to find the book. If you follow you me on Instagram, you probably saw an image or two of my editions of this book and even Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman. I got my editions off of Amazon, which I will do if I cannot locate books I want at the local bookstores and thrift locations.
From what I’ve found with other of Mr. Gaiman’s works that if I begin one of his books and set them down, I will have to go back and re-read several pages to back into where I left off. It isn’t because of a bad style of writing, this is something I have found I have to do so I can understand more intense styles of writing which I found this work to be, which isn’t a reason for me ever to put a book down completely. I had to do this with works of Lovecraft when I read his work.

This book beautifully brings together how people carry with them their beliefs, no matter where they move or live, their god(s) go with them. It makes the gods more realistic as the people lose faith they suffer, which is beautifully woven throughout the storytelling. It’s rich in atmosphere, which really drew me into the world deeper. Gaiman has always had a beautiful style to his work. It’s a style that I appreciate and love in books I read. It gives credit to his skills as a teller of stories.

I really don’t want to spoil the book much as so much of it is known or converted to television, but I will say I highly recommend reading the book.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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I’m sure today’s review is of no surprise from those that have read my personal work. I have been fascinated by angels, fallen angels, The Watchers, and the list continues for many years. The book that is the subject of today’s review is one of the many books I’ve read on the topic, it is a book I read just this year to be honest after I found it digging through piles of dirty forgotten books at a large thrift store. You know where the bookworms thrive and can be found dancing in a dream-like state. I wasn’t sure what I was getting into, something about the cover and the synopsis peaked my interest. Originally, I had another book set to be reviewed in this one’s place and last minute exchanged as I found this book far more fascinating and wanted to share.

This work is an archaeological journey into a controversial topic, The Watchers. The Watchers were the angels sent to look over man, the ones that laid with the daughters of man and bred with them creating the Nephilim. This book goes into how these beings were a race of flesh and blood beings that pre-date our own. The author gives evidence that supports his claim. The evidence points to them living in Egypt prior to the ancient Egyptians and that they were in fact the buildings of the Sphinx and other megalithic structures.

It goes further stating that large events (like the Ice Age) pushing them upward into other regions living in isolation. He continued to point out how human beings saw this race as angels, godlike even for the way they appeared, and describes the way they looked as being far different than what humans at the time were used to. It reminded me of other references, ones not in this book, to how the shiny armor of the Spaniards gave them a divine appearance to the Indigenous People, but I digress.

The book covers the subjects of Adam and Eve, the Daughters of Cain, actual historical events, depictions of early manuscripts, maps, and shares illustrations too. There is a large list of references in the back of the book to keep everything organized. Collins explains how legends fall to the side and how the memory of the actual historical events have faded. There is a warning in this that because we’re losing our memory of such events we’re shortchanging ourselves. I feel I may not be giving this book the best of reviews to really capture all the information it holds. I found it to be intelligently written, fascinating, and in the very least interesting with the actual historical events and how the author ties everything together.

I loved this book, I love this type of book, and will be keeping my eyes peeked for more work from this author. If any of these topics are interesting to you this is a book for you.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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I once heard that you couldn’t be considered an intellectual or truly into modern philosophy if you hadn’t read Friedrich Nietzsche in some capacity. I had studied him a bit in college, but my focus was on ancient philosophers, the originators of the methods that would eventually be built upon, and those of the ‘old world’. I cannot remember who recommended I read him for a modern taste, but nonetheless I did and have. The edition I’m reviewing isn’t from my college years, this is a more recent purchase. I cannot review the books of my college years as I never kept any copies of textbooks or references from those years beyond writer handbooks. I have copies of other books, but not the ones that had mentioned him.

The edition of Beyond Good and Evil I have is a hard swallow. As someone who does consider themselves a professional book formatter, this book is difficult to read with much of the edition seemingly thrown together like walls of text. It’s poorly organized, with chapters often only set in bold to separate it from the wall of text. It would’ve been better with the blocks being broken up with small decorative graphics to help the eye flow easier down the page. I really don’t think this very good as is and really should be approached with better tactics. Yes, this was bought off of Amazon. I have read that the ebook/digital version is much better, but I don’t have that copy and won’t review it until I do.

Once I was able to ignore the poor format of my edition, I was able to dig into his work. This book criticizes older philosophers and some of their views. He felt they weren’t hard enough on morality, and this book contains his views on Christian theological views. He goes into what he believes are the superior qualities a philosopher should have and really digs into the personality of anyone that dare be a philosopher. He criticizes Christian views. I can see many becoming offended and shutting the books and not giving him another chance.

In basic, he’s trying to say that all of morality as we know it was led astray because the philosophers of old were led astray and thus we have been led into the wrong direction morally and ethically. He rejected the systems that preached truth and didn’t acknowledge they had been led astray along the line without trying to correct their paths. I understood this to mean that you basically can’t do horrible things then go on to preach to others they’re doing wrong when you’re doing the same things. You cannot be a moral mouthpiece when you’re lacking in just that. It’s a very good way to self-examine oneself.

His work is not the type of philosophy you can read quick. You have to let it sink in, really give it a thought. It is only then you will take away something positive from his work. You can easily toss his work to the side as another man ranting, he is offensive, and can be a hard pill to swallow.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website, whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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This is not a book for everyone. It’s a romance novel with erotic aspects to it (sometimes I may write like this, but don’t often read this type of story). This is not my usual book I will grab and read, but sometimes I see something that really makes me want to read it and this was the case. This is considered a paranormal romance involving vampires. I do like a good vampire story. This is book one of another set of books, I am not reviewing those books just the first of the series, which I have been doing throughout these reviews this year.

The story itself is set in modern times with glimpses into the past through dreams of another character. You meet the vampire Don Rafael Perez who rules over Texas and Oklahoma. He meets a woman named Grania and though there is a strong attraction he tries his best not to move on this feeling as he believes he may be heading toward war. Grania dreams and often sees a knight in them, who looks like Don.

I liked the dream sequences, the historical retelling of Don’s life before. It’s well-written, but at times difficult to read because of flow interruptions. Recommended for those that are into this type of genre, vampires, and love stories. There were aspects that reminded me of The Southern Vampire Mysteries by Charlaine Harris.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


Interesting Reads and Related Content