Tag Archives: book

28 DoBR: Wicked – Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory MacGuire

This is another first of a trilogy book collection I will recommend today. I have only read this book of the three, but have had plans to buy and read the other two for some time now. I bought this more for my husband, who also enjoyed it, but eventually, I found myself curious after he told me how interesting it was. On many levels, this book interested me, the storytelling and how it pulled on my heartstrings. It was more adult than I was expecting when going in, my husband hadn’t mentioned anything about the details of how truly adult it could be, but if you can push past all of that it’s a very good story.

I found it to be very realistic with the way this world is created. For example, it covers politics and family dynamics set in the Emerald City. I know it was shipped as a companion or a book-version of the Broadway show Wicked, but I’ve never seen that so I cannot compare the two.

Synopsis:

This is the book that started it all! The basis for the smash hit Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, Gregory Maguire’s breathtaking New York Times bestseller Wicked views the land of Oz, its inhabitants, its Wizard, and the Emerald City, through a darker and greener (not rosier) lens. Brilliantly inventive, Wicked offers us a radical new evaluation of one of the most feared and hated characters in all of literature: the much maligned Wicked Witch of the West who, as Maguire tells us, wasn’t nearly as Wicked as we imagined.

28 DoBR: Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper – Case Closed by Patricia Cornwell

If you’ve not heard of Jack the Ripper at this point my next question is, ‘are you living under a rock?’ Jack the Ripper killed in London’s East End in the late 1800’s. The brutality of it all was just the beginning. For years, decades, and longer everyone’s wondered who he really was. Of course, I’m no different on who he might’ve been, but then again I enjoy true crimes and one not getting solved makes me wonder far more.

I wanted to read this book mostly because it covered a possibility I didn’t know of or had thought of. It is a very interesting read for other true crime buffs. Do I believe the case is really closed as the title explains? Nope, but it is the front running for sure of who Patricia Cornwell believes! She used modern forensics and had access to things that few have been given access to for her investigation and ultimate publishing of her findings.

Highly recommended for people that enjoy true crime, mysteries, fans of killers, and anyone interested in the Jack the Ripper killings.

Synopsis:

Now updated with new material that brings the killer’s picture into clearer focus.

In the fall of 1888, all of London was held in the grip of unspeakable terror.  An elusive madman calling himself Jack the Ripper was brutally butchering women in the slums of London’s East End.  Police seemed powerless to stop the killer, who delighted in taunting them and whose crimes were clearly escalating in violence from victim to victim.  And then the Ripper’s violent spree seemingly ended as abruptly as it had begun.  He had struck out of nowhere and then vanished from the scene.  Decades passed, then fifty years, then a hundred, and the Ripper’s bloody sexual crimes became anemic and impotent fodder for puzzles, mystery weekends, crime conventions, and so-called “Ripper Walks” that end with pints of ale in the pubs of Whitechapel.  But to number-one New York Times bestselling novelist Patricia Cornwell, the Ripper murders are not cute little mysteries to be transformed into parlor games or movies but rather a series of terrible crimes that no one should get away with, even after death.  Now Cornwell applies her trademark skills for meticulous research and scientific expertise to dig deeper into the Ripper case than any detective before her—and reveal the true identity of this fabled Victorian killer.

In Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper, Case Closed, Cornwell combines the rigorous discipline of twenty-first century police investigation with forensic techniques undreamed of during the late Victorian era to solve one of the most infamous and difficult serial murder cases in history.  Drawing on unparalleled access to original Ripper evidence, documents, and records, as well as archival, academic, and law-enforcement resources, FBI profilers, and top forensic scientists, Cornwell reveals that Jack the Ripper was none other than a respected painter of his day, an artist now collected by some of the world’s finest museums: Walter Richard Sickert.

It has been said of Cornwell that no one depicts the human capability for evil better than she.   Adding layer after layer of circumstantial evidence to the physical evidence discovered by modern forensic science and expert minds, Cornwell shows that Sickert, who died peacefully in his bed in 1942, at the age of 81, was not only one of Great Britain’s greatest painters but also a serial killer, a damaged diabolical man driven by megalomania and hate.  She exposes Sickert as the author of the infamous Ripper letters that were written to the Metropolitan Police and the press.  Her detailed analysis of his paintings shows that his art continually depicted his horrific mutilation of his victims, and her examination of this man’s birth defects, the consequent genital surgical interventions, and their effects on his upbringing present a casebook example of how a psychopathic killer is created.

28 DoBR: Edgar Cayce: The Sleeping Prophet by Jess Stearn

I came across the story of Edgar Cayce while online; passing the time on Youtube. This book is one of the few books I ended up buying at my favorite bookstore on him. It saddens me that more people don’t know about Cayce and his gift. He, time and time again, proved his abilities and with that my outlook on things changed. I cannot say that he set me on some spiritual journey or seeking something higher as I was well down that road before I came across him, but it confirmed some things for me for sure.

Coming across a book, article, or meeting someone that really confirms something I’ve thought is huge for me. It calms the doubts and makes them concrete.

This book covers a lot of what he could do. Did you know that he was known in his time for healing people from far distances? Yup! He was ‘sleeping’ (hypnotic state) and a voice explained, one that was not his own, that everyone can do just what he was able to do.

This is something that really meant a lot to me. I do believe everyone is born with a natural ability, but so many either ignore it or don’t know how to embrace it. Cayce, despite his gift or what people may have thought of him, was very religious. He read his Bible cover to cover over and over.

I did come across a special that was being done on him and it said he predicted he would come back, reincarnation, in the year 2020. Well folks, as I type this its 2019. So next year will be an interesting year to see if anything is said and what the future may hold.

Synopsis:

A fascinating biography written by the country’s foremost authorities on metaphysics. 

The Edgar Cayce story is one of the most compelling in inspirational literature. For more than forty years, the “Sleeping Prophet” closed his eyes, entered into an altered state of consciousness, and spoke to the very heart and spirit of humankind on subjects such as health, healing, dreams, prophecy, meditation, and reincarnation. His more than 14,000 readings are preserved at the Association for Research and Enlightenment, Inc., in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

A native of Kentucky with a ninth-grade education, Edgar Cayce accurately predicted two world wars, including the years they began and ended, racial strife in America, the death of John F. Kennedy, and hundreds of other recorded events. He could apparently travel in time and space to treat the ill, and dispensed information that led to innumerable cures where traditional medicine was helpless. The first to introduce many Americans to the concept of reincarnation, Cayce drew on a subconscious Universal Mind for startling information about past and future. In The Sleeping Prophet, Jess Stearn presents the extraordinary story of his life, his healing, his prophecies, and his powerful legacy.

28 DoBR: : Inferno; Purgatorio; Paradiso by Dante Alighieri

I had read this many years ago and have reread it a few times. I’m aware most have labeled this book’s genre as Italian Poetry, but it never really felt like that, personally. Every time I pick this book up I get in this excited mood as if something great is about to happen, and ultimately that continues throughout my reading of Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory. I’m not sure if that’s a natural reaction or a common one, but that’s how I get with stories of this nature.

The illustrations were always so beautiful, but they were only an addition to the beautiful writing and storytelling of Dante. It became a book that made me wonder ‘if this is how it really is where would those I know fall in the three above listed places?’

Synopsis:

The Divine Comedy, translated by Allen Mandelbaum, begins in a shadowed forest on Good Friday in the year 1300. It proceeds on a journey that, in its intense recreation of the depths and the heights of human experience, has become the key with which Western civilization has sought to unlock the mystery of its own identity.

Mandelbaum’s astonishingly Dantean translation, which captures so much of the life of the original, renders whole for us the masterpiece of that genius whom our greatest poets have recognized as a central model for all poets.

This Everyman’s edition–containing in one volume all three cantos, Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso–includes an introduction by Nobel Prize—winning poet Eugenio Montale, a chronology, notes, and a bibliography. Also included are forty-two drawings selected from Botticelli’s marvelous late-fifteenth-century series of illustrations.

#behindthescenes What’s fueling: All of my Every Things?

Who doesn’t like some backstory to the creation of a project? I decided to do just that, share some of this collection more in-depth. Let’s start with that this project marks a first for me. I’m known for my horror and dark fantasy series The Blasphemer Series and my bestselling and award-winning short story Human Ouija. Both of these works were picked up by the publishing house Burning Willow Press, LLC after their self-publications. I’ve been included in many anthologies still writing horror or darker materials.

So, with all that why go poetry if I’ve established myself as a darker author? The answer to that is so simple, it’s time. Behind-the-scenes for years I’ve worked on things that I either never finished or put on a back burner waiting for the time to come. Poetry filled notebooks and then was forgotten about, some even found places on old accounts on art websites or profiles.

Last year, a very old poem of mine found itself included in Southern Fried Autopsies Anthology. It’s a darker poem, but not as dark as I have gotten in the past or even in the present, but it felt right to include that one in that project. Poetry is very personal to me. I can write fiction all day, but non-fiction is harder for me to be willing to release in the world as I’m a private person.

I never considered myself a poet even though I’ve been called that, I just write, and that’s what I call myself…a writer or author in reference toward published works. Poetry is non-fiction for me, it’s all inspired by raw emotions, events, situations, and people I know. With this project, you will be given the closest thing to a memoir or an autobiography I can give at this point in time.

I have planned a memoir and still working on one. This memoir is very hard for me to write because of the topic it covers and a very dark period in my life, but it’s a story that needs to be shared and will be shared when…you guessed it…it’s time.

Poems in this collection will cover topics that included but are not limited to:

  • Dying
  • Love
  • Loss
  • Mortality
  • Inspiration
  • Suffering
  • Life

But with all art, I believe, though these are the topics that inspired different poems included I hope that whoever reads them take away something for themselves. They’re up for interpretation!

28 DoBR: My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George

I’m sure like many of you, this book came into your world, like mine, through school requiring you to read it. I was never one to be told what to read throughout my time in school, but something about this one made me do just that. It was interesting, to say the least. I didn’t become aware it was apart of a trilogy until later years and because of that, I have chosen to only recommend the first one instead of all three.

The illustrations were educational, but I wouldn’t have told my teacher that. They taught me how to make many things, like hooks! I felt for the main character and his want to run away from home, it was something I had considered back in the day, but never actually attempted. I would’ve in no way survived the way the main character did. I had tried to read this to my own kiddo and he never seemed interested. He’s much like me in that way, he just likes what he likes.

This is one of my very few copies I kept from my childhood or sought out to gain again from my childhood it was just that powerful to me. I loved it then and still, love it now.

Synopsis:

“Should appeal to all rugged individualists who dream of escape to the forest.”—The New York Times Book Review

Sam Gribley is terribly unhappy living in New York City with his family, so he runs away to the Catskill Mountains to live in the woods—all by himself. With only a penknife, a ball of cord, forty dollars, and some flint and steel, he intends to survive on his own. Sam learns about courage, danger, and independence during his year in the wilderness, a year that changes his life forever.

 “An extraordinary book . . . It will be read year after year.”
—The Horn Book

28 DoBR: Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

One of the most complex and beautiful writings I’ve ever read. It’s a classic. I got this particular book because it has the translation included from the original German as well as that version as well. The is the first part of two parts of the story.

Synopsis:

The best translation of Faust available, this volume provides the original German text and its English counterpart on facing pages. Walter Kaufmann’s translation conveys the poetic beauty and rhythm as well as the complex depth of Goethe’s language. Includes Part One and selections from Part Two.

28 DoBR: Horns: A Novel by Joe Hill

I’m sure I’m not the only one that saw the movie before finding the book. This is the case. I saw the movie, loved it, and wanted to find out more. Upon discovering it was indeed a book I just had to see how the movie matched up to the original work. 

Thought the book and the movie did have differences they weren’t so vast I couldn’t enjoy the movie after reading the book and vice versa. The book, though good, was also incredibly sad. I felt for the main character Ignatius and how horrible it was for him to not only lose his girlfriend, but for the town to think he did it.

Great writing, great book, and great movie!

Synopsis:

The New York Times bestselling author of Heart-Shaped Box returns with a relentless supernatural thriller that runs like Hell on wheels . . .

Merrin Williams is dead, slaughtered under inexplicable circumstances, leaving her beloved boyfriend Ignatius Perrish as the only suspect. On the first anniversary of Merrin’s murder, Ig spends the night drunk and doing awful things. When he wakes the next morning he has a thunderous hangover . . . and horns growing from his temples. Ig possesses a terrible new power to go with his terrible new look a macabre gift he intends to use to find the monster who killed his lover. Being good and praying for the best got him nowhere. Now it’s time for revenge . . .

It’s time the devil had his due. . . .

28 DoBR: The Essential Tales of H.P. Lovecraft by H. P. Lovecraft

Sometimes I just need to have a book to fill like I’m truly adding to my collection. This is one of those books for me. Will I ever finish adding to my library? Nope! I had grabbed a book from H.P. Lovecraft on seeing others on social media talking about him. I was aware of who he was, but sadly had never read any of his work. 

That book was purchased for my Kindle ereader, but I’m also a big lover of a book I can hold in my hands, hardback or paperback. If it wasn’t for the purchase of that book I probably never would’ve bought today’s recommendation.

This is a great addition to any horror library or Lovecraft fan. I don’t feel it’s needed to go into it further because the work speaks far better than any words I could muster. 

Synopsis:

Discover the true meaning of fear with these classic horror stories.

The Essential Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft collects one of the author’s most popular novellas, “At the Mountain of Madness,” and six of his most famous short stories, including “The Call of Cthulhu,” “The Shadow Out of Time,” “The Dunwich Horror,” “The Colour of Space,” “The Shadow Over Innsmouth,” and “The Whisperer in the Darkness.” These hair-raising tales have inspired generations of authors and filmmakers, including Stephen King, Alan Moore, Guillermo del Toro, and Neil Gaiman. This edition features a new introduction by Peter Cannon.

The Knickerbocker Classics bring together the essential works of classic authors from around the world in stunning editions to be collected and enjoyed.

28 DoBR: Milk and Honey Rupi Kaur

This is one of the most beautiful poetry books that came into my life. I have many books on poetry from classics like Edgar Allen Poe or books on English poets, but wanting something more modern I came across this beautiful work. I felt the poems as if she wrote them knowing me since I was a child, knowing that these were her personal stories. I also enjoyed the drawings finding out later that she had done them herself.

I researched the poet long after flipping through the pages and found that she self-published this originally. It was later picked up by a publishing house. Being a self-published author on a few works and  knowing eventually I’d self-publish my own book of poems I loved this information.

Synopsis:

#1 New York Times bestseller Milk and Honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. About the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity.

The book is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. Milk and Honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.