I had read this many years ago and have reread it a few times. I’m aware most have labeled this book’s genre as Italian Poetry, but it never really felt like that, personally. Every time I pick this book up I get in this excited mood as if something great is about to happen, and ultimately that continues throughout my reading of Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory. I’m not sure if that’s a natural reaction or a common one, but that’s how I get with stories of this nature.

The illustrations were always so beautiful, but they were only an addition to the beautiful writing and storytelling of Dante. It became a book that made me wonder ‘if this is how it really is where would those I know fall in the three above listed places?’

Synopsis:

The Divine Comedy, translated by Allen Mandelbaum, begins in a shadowed forest on Good Friday in the year 1300. It proceeds on a journey that, in its intense recreation of the depths and the heights of human experience, has become the key with which Western civilization has sought to unlock the mystery of its own identity.

Mandelbaum’s astonishingly Dantean translation, which captures so much of the life of the original, renders whole for us the masterpiece of that genius whom our greatest poets have recognized as a central model for all poets.

This Everyman’s edition–containing in one volume all three cantos, Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso–includes an introduction by Nobel Prize—winning poet Eugenio Montale, a chronology, notes, and a bibliography. Also included are forty-two drawings selected from Botticelli’s marvelous late-fifteenth-century series of illustrations.

I’m sure like many of you, this book came into your world, like mine, through school requiring you to read it. I was never one to be told what to read throughout my time in school, but something about this one made me do just that. It was interesting, to say the least. I didn’t become aware it was apart of a trilogy until later years and because of that, I have chosen to only recommend the first one instead of all three.

The illustrations were educational, but I wouldn’t have told my teacher that. They taught me how to make many things, like hooks! I felt for the main character and his want to run away from home, it was something I had considered back in the day, but never actually attempted. I would’ve in no way survived the way the main character did. I had tried to read this to my own kiddo and he never seemed interested. He’s much like me in that way, he just likes what he likes.

This is one of my very few copies I kept from my childhood or sought out to gain again from my childhood it was just that powerful to me. I loved it then and still, love it now.

Synopsis:

“Should appeal to all rugged individualists who dream of escape to the forest.”—The New York Times Book Review

Sam Gribley is terribly unhappy living in New York City with his family, so he runs away to the Catskill Mountains to live in the woods—all by himself. With only a penknife, a ball of cord, forty dollars, and some flint and steel, he intends to survive on his own. Sam learns about courage, danger, and independence during his year in the wilderness, a year that changes his life forever.

 “An extraordinary book . . . It will be read year after year.”
—The Horn Book

One of the most complex and beautiful writings I’ve ever read. It’s a classic. I got this particular book because it has the translation included from the original German as well as that version as well. The is the first part of two parts of the story.

Synopsis:

The best translation of Faust available, this volume provides the original German text and its English counterpart on facing pages. Walter Kaufmann’s translation conveys the poetic beauty and rhythm as well as the complex depth of Goethe’s language. Includes Part One and selections from Part Two.

I’m sure I’m not the only one that saw the movie before finding the book. This is the case. I saw the movie, loved it, and wanted to find out more. Upon discovering it was indeed a book I just had to see how the movie matched up to the original work. 

Thought the book and the movie did have differences they weren’t so vast I couldn’t enjoy the movie after reading the book and vice versa. The book, though good, was also incredibly sad. I felt for the main character Ignatius and how horrible it was for him to not only lose his girlfriend, but for the town to think he did it.

Great writing, great book, and great movie!

Synopsis:

The New York Times bestselling author of Heart-Shaped Box returns with a relentless supernatural thriller that runs like Hell on wheels . . .

Merrin Williams is dead, slaughtered under inexplicable circumstances, leaving her beloved boyfriend Ignatius Perrish as the only suspect. On the first anniversary of Merrin’s murder, Ig spends the night drunk and doing awful things. When he wakes the next morning he has a thunderous hangover . . . and horns growing from his temples. Ig possesses a terrible new power to go with his terrible new look a macabre gift he intends to use to find the monster who killed his lover. Being good and praying for the best got him nowhere. Now it’s time for revenge . . .

It’s time the devil had his due. . . .