Tag Archives: horror

[Brief Words] Interview of Armand Rosamilia

In the world of independent publishing, self, and hybrid we know of a great deal of authors that are considered ‘success stories’. They’re the ‘bigwigs’, but what they all are is very hardworking writers that haven’t stopped since they began. They’re the group that are making a living, successfully, as writers in the industry. One of these very inspirational people is named Armand Rosamilia.

This writer, for as long as I have known of him, hasn’t paused. Working hard online and offline continuing his career. Over these years he’s interviewed me many times, inviting me to show up regularly every year since I first heard of him. He’s captured powerful moments in my career. With all that he’s done not once had I gotten to interview him in return and that’s how this interview began.


Armand, you’ve interviewed me so many times I’m thrilled you’re letting me interview you this time. From what I know, you’re a bigwig in the indie world for your zombie fiction. How did that come about? Why zombies?

Bigwig? You’re going to make me blush. Writing about zombies started as me wanting to write a zombie story, just one story, and then move on to something else in horror. I wanted to write a lot of different things horror-related. I ended up writing a short story with a female lead, Darlene Bobich. Figured I was done. Then a publisher posted they were looking for an extreme zombie novella. The idea for Highway To Hell was born, and that eventually lead into the Dying Days series (with Darlene Bobich as the lead). It’s been nearly ten years, nine main books and just as many side books in the Dying Days world… and it really put me on the map for zombie fiction.

Are you working on anything new? Future plans?

Always working on something new. I have 14 open projects on my whiteboard right now. Crime thrillers. Horror. Contemporary fiction. Noir crime fiction. Nonfiction. All in various stages and many with deadlines I need to get to, so I can add more to the list.

What inspires you when you want to write? Is there anything specific that helps the words flow?

Yes. Fear. Fear of having to go back into retail management, which I did for over twenty years and hated every second of. I’m blessed to be going on my eighth year of writing full-time and making a living at this, but I haven’t gotten comfortable enough to not look over my shoulder at what could’ve been my life.

What’s difficult for you when it comes to writing?

Some days finding the time to actually write. There is so much promotion and learning about selling books and the business changes so frequently. I feel I have to keep up. I also have two podcasts and own the group they’re on, so that is a full-time job in itself. The writing itself is the easy part.

You’ve been podcasting for a long time, how did you get into that?

I was on AM and then FM radio for a couple of years. I saw the writing on the wall. People were listening to more podcasts. I felt I had more control over content and what I could do. I started Arm Cast Podcast in 2014 and have over 300 episodes so far. I interview cool authors (such as yourself!) and get to pick their brains. I’ve also been co-hosting The Mando Method Podcast with Chuck Buda for four years. We talk about writing and publishing.

What do you like most about podcasting and interviewing other people?

Selfishly, it’s all about me. I want to know the author’s tricks. How they deal with the changes in publishing. Who they like working with and who I should steer away from. I can also see where I stand in the specific genres by whether or not I have read them or whoever they are reading. It keeps me honest in that I have to stay on my game.

Most writers declare they cannot begin work without a cup of coffee, but for you what is it? What fuels your work machine? Any habits you’d like to share? Mediation, perhaps?

Umm… coffee. Lots and lots of coffee, in fact. I am a huge fan of three kinds: Dunkin’, Death Wish and Reapers Brew. I figured out I drink over 1,400 cups a year. Why did I figure this out? Because I had a nice burst of high-octane coffee in my system. It helps me to keep going and focus.

Your wife and you have a wonderful dynamic duo of creativity, how do you separate work and home life?

When work is over we might talk a bit about our jobs but it’s usually during dinner or dinner prep. We then don’t dwell on it, especially if either of us has had a bad day. With the quarantine, she’s now working from home. She’s set up in the bedroom and I have my office. We meet in the kitchen for lunch every day and catch up on what’s going on at work, and about six each night we stop working and spend the evening together without work stuff. She is my biggest supporter. She handles the money, the contracts and keeps me in line when I spend too much time doing non-writing things.

When you were younger did you want to become a writer or did this develop later on?

When I was twelve I started reading Dean Koontz. That was it for me. I wanted to become a writer and never looked back, although it took another thirty years for me to make enough to do this for a living. I’d love to someday meet Mr. Koontz, shake his hand and tell him what an inspiration he was to me and still is.

I really could ask you a million questions, but I’ll ask a very common interview question, do you have any advice for aspiring authors?

Read. A lot. Not just in your genre, either. You can learn from reading in other genres, especially nonfiction. Watch the sentence structure. Characterization. All of it. I am not a fan of romance but when my wife watches Hallmark movies I follow along to see the beats in the story. I drive her nuts when I announce ‘end of act one’ or something like that. I can appreciate the writing in any genre and try to incorporate it into the way I look at writing and my work. If I only read horror books my work would suffer.

Check him out more here:

Project Entertainment Network: https://projectentertainmentnetwork.com/

Website: http://armandrosamilia.com






Interesting Reads and Related Content

The Veil: Mothman

The Mothman has been a feature of folklore and myth for many years. A prime focus of movies, books, and mentioned through television. The story goes that the Mothman appeared in the area Point Pleasant, West Virginia in 1966. The legend goes that it only appears right before something bad happens.

He was linked to a bridge collapse that killed over forty people, thus forever being linked with his appearance seen as a bad omen. A ‘bird like creature’ was seen near the bridge and then it collapsed leaving many to connect the dots and blame the creature. Though many believe a sighting to be bad, there are also the group that believe him to be a good omen. That he is a type of protector. This camp of people see his appearance at the bridge, before it collapsed, a foreshadowing or warning that wasn’t heeded.

He has been sensationalized throughout children’s books, but it wasn’t until the novel The Mothman Prophecies by John Keel published in 1975 that a nation became fascinated. This novel turned movie popularized him. The book, one I haven’t personally read, is a imaginative investigation of the cases surrounding the creature between the years of 1966 and 1967.

What this creature truly is no one knows. Theories range from demon to alien protector come to Earth.

Continue reading The Veil: Mothman

Little Lunacies Has Released!

In the immaterial depths lies a layer of darkness. In this absence of light, voices bellow. Crying out their stories and begging for acknowledgment of someone… anyone. For some, they have been given a breath of life over the years, for others they’re just now being released. For the first time, they have been gathered in an ensemble.

Written by Lynn Lesher under her penname L. Bachman, the award-winning author invites you to delight in tales of magic, macabre, and dreadfulness. Whether it is the story of a sorrowful lover reaching into the unknown toward their deceased loved one, or even the story of alien abductee experiencing trauma and Men in Black you should be able to find something in this multi-genre collection you enjoy.

Stories Included
Just Underneath
A Farmhouse Haunting
The Gaze of Destruction
The Owls
Human Ouija
The Painting of Martel
A Man Named Sowder
and more.

Grab your copy today!

On Writing: Little Lunacies (In-depth Story Reveals)

This collection, as previously mentioned in yesterday’s post, was a labor of love. This is the only way to read the short stories I wrote for the serial anthologies once published by Burning Willow Press called Crossroads in the Dark. Each of the books included in that series had a theme. This is where I was encouraged to try new things in my writing. From aliens to what lies underneath the bed all the stories from these books really stirred my thoughts in new directions.

A Farmhouse Haunting, The OWLS, Just Underneath, and A Man Named Sowder come from the Crossroads in the Dark series. They had invited me into another collection titled And the World Will Burn: A Dystopian Anthology. From that anthology you could find my short story A Gaze of Destruction, a tale of a vampire waking up to the world destroyed.

Alongside these works, The Painting of Martel, is included it came via the anthology Painted Mayhem. It was the first collection I had been invited to take part in and themed “killer clowns”. It wasn’t the theme that excited me, honestly, it was the charity it was and is still raising money for. Its goal was to raise money for those suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and the families living with them.

Human Ouija is in this book. It is my bestselling and award-winning short story. The idea for this book and the beginning of its writing began before my first novel, Maxwell Demon, even had even been started. I tabled it for a few months as Maxwell Demon came to the front. The short story and this novella worked together for me in that I got ideas during the planning process for Maxwell Demon that I felt worked better for the short story. Human Ouija also became known as a “branch book” from The Blasphemer Series as in Harvest, the story hinted to. I don’t want to ruin Harvest and the secret, but readers of both the short story and the second installment of The Blasphemer Series know where the reference is!

There are two previously unpublished stories included in this collection. Both have been mentioned to those close to me. My family and friends knew of the raw ideas for The Clockwork Children and Mishnah: The Immortal Man for years, but never got to read the works. I finally found the time to polish them and here we are.

The Clockwork Children is the tragic tale of a couple that lost a child and have aged until they cannot have anymore children. Depressed, the wife is a shell of her former self and her husband is grieving the loss, still, of his child and wife that he’s watching slowly slip away. He is able to turn things around, thanks to magical blessing.

Mishnah: The Immortal Man is a story that began with the question “what did cavemen believe in?” From there the story grew. You’re introduced to Mishnah, a tribal boy, whose sister was an oral storyteller in their tribe. They expel her for teaching lies to the children. The tribe believes the only stories that should be told are survival based. If you cannot see it, it isn’t real. Living with his expelled sister, he entertains her with stories of his own. This eventually leads him to darkness; a dark evil has been listening to his stories from the shadows. A glimpse of the future of Mishnah and his sister leads him to take a deal that grants him immortality. A must read for those interested in new takes on subject matters like father time, immortality, and what life was like before modern man..

What did you think of the post? Like the insights? Let’s start a conversation!

2020 Book Review: A Stir of Echoes by Richard Matheson

Richard Matheson has written one a book that became one of my favorite movies of all time, What Dreams May Come. I have yet to read that book; the film captured me so much, but it is one I’ll read down the road if I ever come across it. He wrote another one, the one for this review, A Stir of Echoes. Again, this is another book I was introduced to as a film first. The movie and the films always differ, I understand there’s technical reason, budget reasons sometimes, and I don’t know what the case was in this situation, but the book isn’t as good as the movie, in my opinion.

This is a classic ghost story. It’s dark, eerie, and creepy. I appreciate Matheson’s work. I’m not sure if it’s because I enjoyed the film so much, but the book is good–different, but good. I don’t enjoy writing about things I don’t like. I don’t want to bring attention to those things and rarely express a distaste publically, but in this review, I have to say if I had to compare, though the book is good I prefer the movie version better. I enjoy the story, the slow rolling out as if its fog coming into town, but the movie spoiled me. It didn’t ruin things enough for me I won’t read it again. I most likely will, but if you’re going to go into this expecting it to be exactly like the novel, don’t.

The book is best summed up as its own entity. I wish I could have enjoyed it more. I had trouble not comparing it to the movie throughout my reading and I believe I ruined my experience; this is the main reason I’ll return to it later. Perhaps in a few years. The writer is excellent. A great talent. He’s done a lot of movies and television work and I’ve wondered if working in books was harder for him or working in film as many writers, including myself, have described scenes we’re writing as a scene in our head we’re trying to describe into words. Sometimes we fail in the translation and sometimes we’re able to succeed in our attempts.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

2020 Book Review: Roald Dahl’s Book of Ghost Stories

This is not a book written by Dahl. Instead, this is a collection of authors he wanted for a collection with the theme ghost stories. The introduction told helped me fix my initial mistake. I’m glad I usually flip through a few pages and read before picking up and purchasing, read the summary, and really break a book down now that I’m older. It really becomes a matter of ‘is this worth my money’ when I approach a book to enjoy and not because of the industry I work.

E. F. Benson’s story In the Tube stood out the most to me. I really enjoyed it. The other stories included, are very well curated, but I enjoyed this one the most. I found each story to be well written and just the right amount of fear. It seems I come across too many stories that rely on gore to scare in their tales, not enough anticipation with delivery. This collection is the type I enjoy. A dribble here and a dot there of ‘what’s going on’ cleaned up with the reveal and the exhale of making it to the end. A thrill-ride.

In the introduction, the tale of the book’s conception is shared. The struggles of finding a good or even a great story when wanting to create an anthology. I’ve been down this road myself and it can be a frustration, but it also tells of the gems that can be found. A reflection of today, for me. Now and then you come across a book you can really sink your teeth into. This collection is worthy of a chomp again from me.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

2020 Book Review: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

I read this book for the first time in the fifth grade as part of a project on the author Mary Shelley. I admit, back then I really didn’t want to do anyone else. I had never read her work but heard of her and her work in classes. I never knew that this author would become one of my favorites as I grew up. To this day, she along with Poe, Lovecraft, and Rice have become beloved writers to me.

This book, specifically, took me into a world of darkness that I could relate. The character of the monster spoke to me. He was an outsider, and I often felt that way. Misunderstood, the monster, and never accepted. These were all things I could relate to as a young girl new to the area and from a different part of the country. It taught me that ‘the monster’ wasn’t a monster, the true monster was how we treat people different from ourselves. It’s a life lesson I’ve always carried with me and seen, sadly, repeated. The true monster is how cruel people can be and how judgmental people can be.

Shelley’s words were dark and romantic and this style, over time, became one style I favored and cherished most in a book. I love words, the romantic way they can flow; perhaps I can consider her one of my earliest influences on molding me into a writer.

Not wanting to be a book snob here, but there has never been a movie or television version that has captured me the same way as this book has. If you only know this book because of a movie I highly recommend reading the book. Sometimes, I admit, a movie or show can give a book justice, but I have not come across one on this title.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.

Official Announcement: Little Lunacies & Cover Reveal

So far, the information about this collection is that it will include Human Ouija. This is a collection signed to the wonderful press Dark Books Press publishing company and will be the continuing of a project originally discussed and was in progress when the doors closed at Burning Willow Press. I had already begun collecting short stories, polishing stories, and reworking several unfinished or finished works that needed to be adjusted for publication more.

As of right now, this collection has moved into the editing phase. I still do not have a date for the release as this post goes live, but the publisher and myself have high hopes of it coming out sooner rather than later.

Contents of collection so far:

  • Just Underneath (psychological thriller)
  • A Farmhouse Haunting (ghost story)
  • The Gaze of Destruction (post-apocalypse vampire tale)
  • The Owls (Sci-fi horror)
  • Human Ouija (Paranormal) (Bestselling and Award-winning short story)
  • The Painting of Martel (supernatural, possession, serial-killer)
  • A Man Named Sowder (psychological ghost story)
  • The Clockwork Children (supernatural, emotional)

Readers may recognize many of these stories. Several have been published in other anthologies, mainly in the Crossroads in the Dark series that was published by Burning Willow Press. The Clockwork Children has never been published before. There are a few more stories I want to add to round the collection out, but this is up to my publisher.