Tag Archives: interview

Catching up w/Random Evolved’s Richard Pruitt

Bachman: We’ve known each other for a long, but much has changed in that time. What can you tell us that has changed for TBK in the past couple of years?

Pruitt: Well, the TBK name is being dropped in a few weeks to be replaced with our main company name Random Evolved. Outside that we are the same random people who will post about anything each day.

Bachman: Covid has changed the landscape of publishing, podcasting, and conventions. How have you adapted to the lockdowns and recording of podcasts?

Pruitt: The pandemic changed a lot for me in terms of everything. Last year was our first-year publishing books and damn, it was like being thrown to the wolves. We had plans to do book signings with a local author signed to us, but our local bookstore was destroyed by a tornado right after places started to close. It was a weird first year. As for podcasts, I like to record in person. The dynamic is so fun but last year that had to change.

Bachman: You became a publisher with Random Evolved. How has that been for you? Everything you expected or worse?

Pruitt: Not withstanding the happenings of the pandemic, I have loved everything about it. I learned how to format, design covers, come up with marketing campaigns. A lot of which we didn’t get a chance to use…yet. You can feel the excitement throughout our staff.

Bachman: You’ve built a successful empire, is there anything you’d wish you’d learned sooner or anything you wish you could’ve changed?

Pruitt: Not to let negative comments get to me. Also, it is a marathon and not a sprint.

Bachman: What made you want to even start ‘the buzzkill magazine’?

Pruitt: This story is the main reason why the name is completely changing. When I was in high school before the days of fast internet, I was an editor with my high school newspaper “The Canine Courier.” And outside theater, journalism became my favorite time of the day. And it was not due to having those cool colored MACs from the early 2000s. I wrote the entertainment section for the paper. And when I hated something, I called it ‘The Entertainment Buzz Kill’ and decided to run with that name. As I have aged, I realized the name just does not fit us anymore. We cover a wide variety of subjects and changing it to Random Evolved Magazine just makes sense.

Bachman: When did you know you wanted to strengthen by branching out into novel publishing, podcasting, and all that readers can enjoy at your website?

Pruitt: Podcasting just came naturally as I have a background in radio. As for everything else, it just felt like the right move.

Bachman: Is there anything you haven’t done yet and looked forward to doing or have been wanting to do?

Pruitt: Soon. I can’t give more details just yet. But soon.

Bachman: Anything currently you’d like to share with my readers?

Pruitt: We have some great titles coming out this summer. The release of The Book of Roland by James Master with all new content. So, if you read this the first time it dropped, this is a brand-new book. Unbreakable Mind by Bryan Tann and Kindra Sowder. Third eye by Cindy Johnson. A book of poetry from Chelsea Hays and so much more. A few surprises. Plus, a launch of the company that started last year. We try to do something new each day, that is why I chose the name Random Evolved.


I recommend checking out the following related links

The Interview of Voice Actor Sean Rhead

Audiobooks are the next level in reaching your readers. Paperback, hardback, and even digital formats are other common ways, but its a dream for any novelist to get their work into audio. Audible is the most common way, the biggest as well, and for me I wanted this like everyone else. For those that have followed along with me, you know I’ve had struggles in this department. I’ve had narrators quits and others not be able to continue with the projects. This made me want to give up, but the passion for my work continued and eventually I found a man named Sean Rhead.

I wanted to introduce you to him with an interview. Here is how that interview went.


Bachman: You’re a voice actor and narrator. How did you get into that line of work?

Rhead: I’ve always been more of an auditory and hands-on learner, so audiobooks are my preferred way of experiencing literature. I grew up listening to Jim Dale narrate the Harry Potter series, and I loved the way he voiced all of the characters and brought that world to life. I love the idea of giving that same experience to someone else who absorbs content the same way.

Bachman: What do you do when you’re not recording?

Rhead: I teach general music (preK-8) during the day. When I come home, I love to sing and play guitar, duet sea shanties on TikTok, and end the night watching a movie with my girlfriend. 

Bachman: Have you ever thought about writing a book of your own? Why or Why not?

Rhead: Writing has never been at the forefront of my mind; I’ve always been a performer first. But I’ll never say never.

Bachman: What are your favorite genres to narrate?

Rhead: Fantasy. I love getting acquainted with an entire ensemble of characters, besides creative world-building.

Bachman: What was your favorite book to narrate so far?

Rhead: Far too many to name, but I will always be grateful to Sarah K. L. Wilson for giving me my start with “Dragon Chameleon.” Not only did I love getting to know her characters and her world, but I definitely grew over the course of that series (both on the creative AND technical side of audiobook production).

Bachman: We met through ACX, what made you want to narrate The Blasphemer Series?

Rhead: I LOVE a good redemption story, and Maxwell’s journey drew me in right from the start. I was compelled by where he began, and in the end, his resolution was as satisfying as I knew it would be.

Bachman: Has there ever been a scene or book you couldn’t finish? Why or why not?

Rhead: Not that I can think of. I do have a lot of books on my TBR list (that I’m NOT narrating) that I will finish eventually. Such titles include “The Lies of Locke Lamora,” “Mistborn,” “The Fires of Vengeance,” and “Six of Crows,” just to name a few.

Bachman: Is there anything you’re currently working on that you can share with readers?

Rhead: In addition to my continued work on “The Blasphemer Series,” I’m also currently working on a YA fantasy mystery novel entitled “The Other Side” by Justin Jay Gladstone. Anticipated release for that one is sometime mid to late spring.

Bachman: You must be very organized with the amount of work you do, how do you stay on track?

Rhead: I appreciate that you think I am organized. Hahaha! In all seriousness though, on my recording and editing days, I like to set specific goals in place (I would like to record this page to that page, or I would like to edit this much time of audio). I have gotten a better understanding of how much time it takes me to meet those goals, so I always like to make sure I have ample time to meet them.

Bachman: If you could have a dream book to narrate, what would it be?

Rhead: It would be a daunting task, but I would LOVE to narrate anything by Brandon Sanderson.

Bachman: Is there anything you’d like readers to know about you?

Rhead: I love Disney and musical theatre, and I am a proud ally of the POC/LGBTQ+ communities.


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Interview of a Character: Imogene from The Blasphemer Series: Harvest

The Interviewer is a mysterious figure that has contact with the characters of The Blasphemer Series and thus interviews them time to time. In this interview you will see them interacting with Imogene, a female character from book two Harvest. Imogene is a gifted Seer of the Present.

This particular interview happened before tragic events that unfolded in The Blasphemer Series. To understand better it is recommended you read The Blasphemer Series: Harvest.


The Interviewer: When you’re introduced into the book you’re struggling with withdrawals, do you wish you’d been introduced in a different way?

Imogene: It’s how the story went. I can’t change it or how I was living my life at the time. You’d try and find an escape too if you have my curse they call a gift.

The Interviewer: Can you share with us something we may not know about you?

Imogene: I liked cheesecake and coffee.

The Interviewer: Is there anything that upset you about the book?

Imogene: It seems I was almost forgotten except for Margot and Isiah. I miss him.

The Interviewer: Will we see you in future books?

Imogene: Perhaps. Not all of the stories have been told yet. It’s up to the author to discover a way to bring me back into the fold. I’m not sure how I would or my purpose. It’s not like I had much of one in the first place.

The Interviewer: Well that’s just not true. A lot of people like you. They wanted to know about you, your relationship with Isiah, and some even asked the author to do a book of just you. As a side-story type of thing.

Imogene: Interesting. It’d be interesting to see what the author would have to say about me in a side-story book. What would that even be called? A companion novel?

The Interviewer: Yes, that’s what those books would be called. So, Imogene, we know what happens near the end of the book. So is there something you wish all the readers knew that perhaps got left out of the story?

Imogene: There is something, but I’m not sure how well it would’ve done. You see the writer writes in a certain style that may leave out things. If the main character can’t witness it then sometimes it doesn’t make it in. It’s a mix of third-person narration and first-person. I’ve personally never seen a book written like it. I wish she would’ve left how I fought hard. How even when ingested I was kicking, screaming, and fighting.

The Interviewer: Do you feel you were given no justice?

Imogene: In some ways yes and in some ways no. I don’t want to really go into it. There’s nothing that can be done now.

The Interviewer: Since you’re on the other side is there any knowledge you can give us that those still living may not know?

Imogene: There’s a spy among them, but he’ll get his. He’ll flip and ultimately help them.

The Interviewer: Will you say who?

Imogene: I’m not allowed to.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you’d like to say to the remaining Seers, Briar and Dante?

Imogene: Dante’s going to be just fine. I am not allowed to say too much, but without him the world would truly fall apart. Briar is in good hands even though she doesn’t realize it, being possessed by anyone else would destroy her.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you’d like to say to readers or potential readers?

Imogene: I’m gone, I pass in this book. That’s no secret, but what many don’t know is I can now live on because of them. The author’s a bit weird, but she has done good by me by telling my story. If you read it I can live on in your memory and thoughts. I do hope you’ll read it. Please read.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you wish to say perhaps to Margot or Isiah if they read this interview?

Imogene: I am sorry Margot. I did love you and still do. You didn’t have to take me in and you did. You were a mother to me and I never appreciated you. To Isiah, I guess I’d say, I miss and love you.


Margot has gotten to read the interview and it helped her with her mourning. Isiah was too busy to read it. Read The Blasphemer Series: Harvest when it re-releases to understand all of this better.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

Interview of a Character: Maxwell from The Blasphemer Series: Maxwell Demon

The Interviewer is a mysterious figure that has contact with the characters of The Blasphemer Series and thus interviews them time to time. In this interview you will see them interacting with Maxwell, a the main male character of the book Maxwell Demon from The Blasphemer Series.

This particular interview has a history that it happened to be ‘found’ in the ‘archives’ from The Alexandrian vaults. It takes place after the first book published. No-one knows where it came from or who The Interviewer is.


The Interviewer: How do you feel about your story being chronicled for mass readers to get a hold of and read?

Maxwell: I think the story must be told. It’s an important endeavor to open your mind to a new possibly.

The Interviewer: What do you think of L. Bachman being the one to write your story and the stories of others?

Maxwell: She’s alright, she’s good people. I like her tattoos.

The Interviewer: Whatever happened to Eshu?

Maxwell: :chuckles: Gabriel took care of him about as much as someone like Eshu could be taken care of. You must understand Eshu is a guardian and a very powerful spiritual being. He learned his lesson, which is all I can say about that.

The Interviewer: What’s your biggest regret?

Maxwell: In the book, it’s listed as never getting to Lilith in time, but truth be it there is a bigger regret that I have and that is defying The Mother and The Father.

The Interviewer: You witnessed reincarnation first hand with following Lilith through her many lives, what were the best life and the worse that you saw her go through?

Maxwell: The worse life she lived I witnessed for a brief period was that of her as a child. You must think of things in the time frame of which they happened. At one time in history to be red haired was thought of as a bad thing, a sign of a witch. We all know that Witches come in all shapes, colors, backgrounds, and countries, but in this particular life she had been hidden away for a very long time. Her hair had been sooted and changed colors with dyes of the time. In the end, she had been murdered by a mob worried she was going to bring bad upon the land.

The best life she lived I can remember was that of peace. She was in Scotland living on the outskirts. Her hovel overlooked a valley and a river. It was quiet and peaceful. Sadly, like most of her lives she had either been killed or died tragically in ways I couldn’t do anything about. In this one, she had gotten sick and died. I couldn’t heal her. When she saw me for the smallest of moments I could swear she recognized me, but by the time I had gotten to her she had been sick for a very long time. I still don’t know what she died of.

The Interviewer: We only get a taste of a few of her lives, can you elaborate on others? Why is it so hard for you to find her? The compass worked in the published account why not just do that earlier?

Maxwell: She had been a male in several lives, a warrior or soldier that led to her death in those lives. She had been just about anything you could be, must remember she had been around a very…very long time. A monk, a cult leader, a housewife, and even a school teacher are a few that are coming to mind. She’s been every color variation, a wide range of ages in her lives, and involved in most religions.

I simply hadn’t thought about making a compass, the idea never came to mind until later years after struggling for many lifetimes of never finding her. I had my own struggles as well giving me problems and diverting me. Goodwitch Anya also found out about me and contacted me. Things went smoother after that.

The Interviewer: Have you spent more time on Earth since the book has been released?

Maxwell: I have no comment.

The Interviewer: Your Enochian tattoos, how do they work? I’ve read that some, that got early copies of the story, wished they had a compass like yours.

Maxwell: :chuckles: Yes, I can see how a compass would work for many. Simply having something right there literally on your hand pointing you to whomever or whatever you need. I can’t begin reveal the magic of my etchings, I got in trouble once before for sharing too much knowledge with mankind.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you wish could’ve left into the story that was taken out?

Maxwell: The story written was specific, it was to launch a series that would talk and discuss many other lives and others stories. This one was specific to me finding Lilith, but I have plenty of stories. Perhaps she’ll write them down as well in a book for others. I have dealt with Raphaim, Canaanites, and have stories upon stories I’d love to share.

The Interviewer: What do you see happening with The Blasphemer Series?

Maxwell: There is a great evil coming. There are many stories to tell.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

[BRIEF WORDS] 2017 THROWBACK Interview of Bryan Tann

Bachman: Tell us a bit about yourself, your work, what genre(s) you write in, and something you’d like to share about yourself that maybe isn’t well know.

Tann: My name is Bryan Tann. I’m a young kid in a near old fart’s body. I am the author of the Dark Lands universe and the John Baker Chronicles series. I am an author in the CHBB Publishing family. I don’t really have a “genre” that I write in. I enjoy a little bit of everything so I try to incorporate a little bit of everything in my writing. I am huge into collecting movies and tend to yell at the TV at characters that annoy me. Like Dudley Dursley. Selfish, spoiled little prick!

Bachman: Is being a writer a gift or a curse? It is a little bit of both, to be honest. I love being able to find the words to express myself.

Tann: I love the story ideas that I can come up with, but when the muse isn’t there and I NEED to write and can’t it is emotionally painful.

Bachman: What’s your writing process look like? What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Tann: My writing process isn’t really all that special. I tend to research as I go along because my writing process is very chaotic. I get an idea and I start writing. When I come up to something that I do not know about, then I look it up. I find a few different sources and if they come together, there you go. My muse comes and goes so sporadically that I never want to lose it when it comes.

Bachman: If you were deserted on an island, which three people would you want to have with you? Why? Criteria: One fictional character from your book.

Tann: I’m honestly not sure. Most of my characters are aspects of me, so they live in my brain anyway. If I was forced to pick one, it would probably be Enya Blake. Who wouldn’t want to be stranded on an island with a beautiful woman?

Bachman: One fictional character from any other book.

Tann: From any book? Hmmm that is a tough one. Maybe Hermione Granger. If I can’t have Enya there, why not have a crafty, genius level witch on my side?

Bachman: One famous person that is not a family member or friend.

Tann: Hmm famous person that isn’t a family member or friend…wow. That’s hard. I would say Ronda Rousey. If someone tried to beat me up, she would have my back.

Bachman: What about the genre(s) you write in attracted you to them?

Tann: I love vampires. Period. Vampires, Werewolves, Witches, Wizards, any of that. I love them. The power, the frightening world, I love it all.

Bachman: What’s your latest release about?

Tann: So the first book in the Dark Lands universe, The Enforcer is a story of a bad ass vampire Enforcer named Bryce Kreed. He has had his job as the judge, jury, and executioner of the vampire world, but the power went to his head and he began to enjoy killing too much. After having a…an epiphany…he realizes that he needs to change. So he wants forgiveness, but forgiveness for a vampire isn’t easy. Fast forward a century and he’s stuck in a rut, until Enya Blake, a Mistress Vampire three thousand miles away, needs his help. He first decides to help her just to piss off his “boss” in his hometown until he falls in love with her and decides her safety is his top priority.

Bachman: Do consider yourself to be a successful writer? If so, why? If not, what would make you successful?

Tann: I don’t know really. I mean, how does one define success? Am I doing better than I was when I first started writing ten years ago? Absolutely. I had to learn A LOT of the ups and downs of this business. I needed to meet good people in this business. I have done more in the last year than I did in the nine years previous. So in that regard I’m doing a lot better. Let’s see if it translates into my sales in March HAHAHAHAHA

Bachman: A brilliant idea hits you, what do you do first?

Tann: I try to find a piece of scrap paper and I start writing the idea out.

What one thing would you give up to become a better writer? Hahahaha working a day job! But seriously, I would probably get rid of gaming systems. Get me a Blu-Ray player and I don’t really need anything else.

Bachman: Do you believe in writer’s block?

Tann: Oh God yes. It hits me all the time.

Bachman: Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

Tann: I have only had a few since my first release of The Enforcer and its sequel, The Hunted, didn’t really do that well. I didn’t really get any negative critiques because it was people that knew me that reviewed.

Bachman: How did publishing your first book change your process of writing? How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

Tann: Which time? HAHAHA. Honestly I just needed to become a stronger writer. I needed to write in a way that was easier for the reader. I needed to grow and I think I am a much better writer than I was even a year ago.

Bachman: Does a big ego help or hurt writers?

Tann: I think it hurts. When you’re a blatant jerk, you rub people the wrong way. Although you need to have a good balance of being a good person but setting boundaries and expressing confidence. When I think ‘big ego’ I think massive asshole.

What is the most unethical practice in the publishing industry? I hate the people that ‘troll’ writers and negatively review them. Or steal their work and try to pass it off as their own. If you can’t create your own shit then don’t. If you steal someone else’s, you should have some serious consequences come your way. Like launched into the sun.

Bachman: Does your family support your career as a writer?

Tann: I am a firm believer that blood makes you related, loyalty makes you family. Those that I am related to that are family are supportive as best they can be. Those that are just related, I could care less what they think. Those that are straight family, they do what they can. Honestly, though, I’ve never had anyone make a fuss over things that I do. You know? In some instances, I think that, as a kid, so long as I stayed out of trouble with the law they were satisfied.

Bachman: How do you balance making demands on the reader with taking care of the reader?

Tann: I don’t know yet. I haven’t really been in that situation. I just want to give the reader something great to read and get into. I want their emotions to be hit in all directions. If they hate me for what I did, I hope that they were so into it that I took it into a direction they weren’t emotionally ready for, so they’re like “DAMN YOU!” sort of how people were toward JK Rowling when she killed Dobby and Fred Weasley. It’s because we fell in love with those characters and then BAM! GONE! I want to have that same kind of reaction.

Check out more from Bryan here:

Some links contained in the above interview may no longer work properly. Images may have been lost over the years as well for some interviews and older content.

This is an older piece of content being re-posted.


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[Brief Words] 2015 Throwback Interview of Casey Bond

Bachman: What’s your favorite book you’ve written so far and why?

Bond: Honestly, it would be my Harvest Saga series. I love the world in that book. It’s dystopian and so much fun to write because it’s one of my favorite genres to read. And it’s more complex than it seems.

Bachman: What keeps you inspired?

Bond: I seem to have caught the writing bug and it won’t let me rest! I’m always thinking of new plots and characters. But I’d have to say that my family, friends and fans keep me going. It would be pretty disheartening not to have support. But when someone drops a note on my timeline or in a message that says they read and loved my book and they ask when the next is coming out….that’s the best feeling. It keeps me going.

Bachman: What inspired your latest story?

Bond: Crazy Love is set in a time where a second US Civil War has broken out. It’s not a story about the war itself, but rather of one widow’s attempt at survival and of her grief. But more than that, it’s a story about second chances. We all need those.

It was inspired by my home state of WV and the fact that we all feel depression and grief at times. But we can’t let it overwhelm us or take us down. We fight.

Bachman: Anything you can share about this story?

Bond: Excerpt: “Some days I wonder if I’m not better off dead,” I vowed, clenching my teeth tight. The muscles in my arms burned like wildfire and sweat beaded and dripped off my face. I gave the enormous iron monster another shove for good measure. It wouldn’t budge. Stubborn thing.

Backing away, I gave it the stink eye as I caught my breath and let my body rest for a minute. My loud and overly dramatic groan filled the moth-ball scented air around me. Damn it. I’d have to ask Joey for help. And, if there was one thing I hated, it was bothering Joey. He already did so much to help me out since…

I turned and looked at Andrew. He wore a tight white t-shirt and a shit-eating grin, reclining in the plush upholstered fire-engine red chair that had been Mrs. Maddox’s favorite. It was God-awful—gaudy and matched absolutely nothing in the house, but hey, when you live to be ninety-something, you earn the right to a ridiculous chair, and just about anything else you want to wear, have or do.

Pushing my fingers into my curly brown hair, sweat coated my skin. I growled at him. It was all his fault. “This is all your fault.”

That arrogant smirk fell off his face quick. “None of this is my fault,” he protested, sitting forward with elbows on his knees. The full lips of his mouth dropped open.

Bullshit. “It totally is and you know it.”

He huffed and then ran the fingers of both hands through his now-hanging head. “Are we going to go through this again?”

“No. Not this morning. We have to hurry. Now, disappear while I go run and get Joey.”

I looked back at the cast iron beast and sighed. When I looked back toward Andrew, he was gone. He followed direction better as a ghost than he ever did when he was alive.

I would have to suck it up, put my big-girl panties on as Andrew had always said and ask for help. Trudging to Joey’s house in the dark was gonna suck. The winter had been harsh and hadn’t quite let go of the land or the weather yet. Technically, it was spring. I guess the seasons aren’t dependent on those little calendar squares after all. Effing calendar.

I guided myself to Joey’s with the flashlight’s tiny sphere of light. Thank God for the battery stockpile. The path beneath my feet was still worn but in the summer would be covered with briars and weeds. Though we would use it, it wouldn’t be as often. We would both have more than enough work to do on our own plots of land.

Joey lived over the hill from me. His farm was situated behind Andrew’s
…er, mine, and was nearly the same size and shape.

Andrew’s folks passed last year. Andrew and I were married and since he was their only child, the farm was technically and legally mine now. Although there were no courts to validate my claim on the land and property. I’d just have to treat it like mine and defend it the same.

Twelve-hundred acres of rolling hills, hay and timber. If it wasn’t for Joey, I wouldn’t have survived this long. He was a country boy—a cocky one, but he was efficient and a hell of a lot more knowledgeable than me. And that was what made me cringe as I walked up the wooden steps and onto his front porch. He was a boy, at least in my eyes he was. I considered him a little brother at this point. Unfortunately, sometimes Joey didn’t feel the same way. He was always talking about repopulating the U.S. with me. Cringe. Guys were always horny and it wasn’t like there was a surplus of anything now, let alone women.

I knocked on the door. After a few minutes with no signs of life, I knocked again, louder and for longer.

Finally, I heard him. He opened the door with one green eye opened, the other clenched tight. “Did you finally come to your senses, Shelby? Decide you want some of this?”

I rolled my eyes at him. I knew it was coming.

“Don’t flatter yourself, Romeo. I need your muscles.”

“My man muscle?” he said in a sleep-thickened voice. Joey smirked, finally opening his protesting eye and wagging his sleep-mussed eyebrows. The blonde hair on the left side of his head was matted down against his skull and the rest was sticking straight up like he’d stuck his finger in a light socket.

“Joey, get dressed and get your hind end out here. Old Lady Maddox died.”

That was all it took. Word that someone had kicked the bucket and people began circling like vultures to take what they needed from the belongings left behind. I was the first vulture who had found her. So far, no one else knew she’d died in her sleep and I planned to get that stove out of her house come hell or high water.

The Cases had prepared for every apocalyptic scenario known to man except for one: that they would pass on leaving everything to me. I was an apocalypse unto myself. They would have known how to fix the things I didn’t have a clue about.

Survival skills: one.

Shelby: zero.

Bachman: I’ve seen you participate in several events; anymore we can look forward to seeing you participate in?

Bond: I have an online event planned in March with some of my author friends. It’s called March Into Reading and here is the link: Facebook Event

Here are author events I plan to attend in 2015:
Roanoke Author Invasion, April
UtopYA Con, June
Books & Bourbon, August
Pumpkin Festival, October
Great Lakes Book Bash, October
Rebels & Readers, November

Bachman: What’s your favorite part? Writing or marketing?

Bond: Writing, I’m not the best at marketing and it takes so much time.

Bachman: For fans, is there anything you’d like to announce or surprise them with?

Bond: Well, sure!

*Dark Bishop (serial series I’m writing with my bestie, Rachael Brownell) will release in April. One book per day from April 29-May 3, 2015)

*Reclaim should be available in May. I don’t have a set release date yet, but it’s coming!

*I’m getting ready to write a contemporary serial that is related to SIN…. J

*Planning to write a new paranormal and dystopian later in the year.

Bachman: Is there a book you just can’t put down right now?

Bond: I just finished Mia Sheridan’s Kyland. It is amazing. I might re-read that one. Her books are fantastic and Kyland did not disappoint. That’s a paperback I plan to buy now.

Bachman: What are some of your favorite writers and books?

Bond: Mia Sheridan (Kyland, Archer’s Voice)
Elle Casey (Rebel Series)
Amy Bartol (Premonition Series)
Jo Michaels (I, Zombie)
Diana Gabaldon (Outlander)
Lila Felix (Anything she writes)

And last but never least, my bestie, Rachael Brownell. I love her Holding On series, Secrets & Lies and Monroe from Take a Gamble is my book boyfriend. Hands off, Ladies!

Purchase Links:
Crazy Love – Amazon

Find her on the net:
Amazon Profile
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Goodreads
Tumblr
Pinterest

Some links contained in the above interview may no longer work properly. Images may have been lost over the years as well for some interviews and older content.

This is an older interview being re-posted.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

INTRODUCING BRIEF WORDS

Some time ago I interviews many individuals in the publishing business; from authors to publishers. Originally titled 15 for 15, they’re finding a new home under The Word, here on the site. These interviews and guest bloggers will be found under Brief Words. Why Brief Words? Most in the business are very busy and for a brief moment of their day they give or gave me some of their time, sharing themselves with the world right here on my website (often giving exclusives).

Right now some of these posts are listed under The Word, but these selected guest appearances will be migrating to their new location. These wonderful contributors have giving over their time to share their stories and thoughts.

With that, allow me to introduce Brief Words. I hope you enjoy the content to come. If you are apart of the industry and would like to take part, please contact me via email: writerbachman@gmail.com

Interesting Reads and Related Content

F.A.Q.s w/L. Bachman

Hopefully, this section of the site will answer many questions that I’ve been asked, re-asked, and asked even more. I don’t mind being interviewed, by all means do interview me, but most of the time the same things are asked over and over. It’s all part of the business of promotion.


What inspires you?

Anything and everything.

How long have you been writing?

I started writing at a young age. I didn’t know at that time it was a form of therapy. A way to control my situation which I felt out of control of.

Have you ever put someone you know into a story?

Usually it’s just interesting traits of personality, but by name yes. The one that I have done had traits of the real person, but I never see them actually in the situation I put them in. They knew I was going to use them and it was more of a joke because I needed a character and name for a short story.

When did you begin to call yourself a writer?

When I was referred to by other people as one. I just considered myself as a person that wrote.

Are you family members supportive?

Yes.

What do you think when someone says writing isn’t a real job?

My taxes say otherwise.

You write horror, do you like scaring people?

I write a lot of different things, just most have fallen into the horror genre. I don’t think what I write is really scary, but some may see it otherwise. It was another author that informed me I was even writing horror. I do play up the ‘scary writer’ thing and joke about ‘enjoying to scare people’, but what I hope really can be boiled down to hoping someone gets something, good, bad, or otherwise, from something I’ve written.

Who are some of your favorite authors?

Edgar Allen Poe, Mary Shelly, Anne Rice, Neil Gaiman, and HP Lovecraft. Those at the traditionally published and for the indie-published I’m a fan of P. Mattern, Kindra Sowder, DS Roland, SL Kerns, Kerry Alan Denney, and Thomas Vaughn.

When not writing what are you doing?

I do a lot of art. I sometimes take on clients that want to hire me for cover work. I also enjoy spending a lot of time with my family.

How do you balance work and family?

I carve out time for work. Since I work for myself it’s a flexible schedule I’m working with which makes it easier. I spend a lot of time working with my family on spending time together. I do not work on Sundays and cut back greatly on doing anything on Saturdays. I also deal with insomnia that comes and goes whenever so often time I’m up at night when my family is sleeping which also is a key time for me to get a lot of work done. It’s a balance, that’s for sure, but not impossible.