Throughout the writing process, Maxwell Demon underwent many changes. I’ve shared that when I was back writing it I was just about finished and deleted the entire last chapter and part of the chapter before that one because it simply didn’t feel right. Along with this over time I have shared other things that have changed. This is part one of a two part post sharing some of these differences.

Some changes happened during professionally editing forever being lost for a great story and some never made it past the drafting phase. For readers, you may recognize names or scenes, but remember them differently or names being completely different from the version you read. Things change a lot during the writing process.

I hope you enjoy!


Maxwell Demon Introduction

I had originally posted this in the group Bachman’s Blasphemers, the fan group created for fans and others that would like to stay up-to-date more regularly than the author page and the series page for the books, but for whatever reason Facebook glitched and wouldn’t allow it to be posted. I took that as an opportunity to post it on the website in a more expanded version. I always love, as a reader, hearing about an author’s process in creating a book I enjoyed or even details behind the stories that didn’t make the cut into what got published. I’m not the only one, I’m sure, so here are some behind-the-scenes and spoilers from the book, The Blasphemer Series: Maxwell Demon.

Original Beginning

The original beginning of Maxwell Demon was much different than what made the final cut and went into publication.

Raw Excerpt

Visions of wisped crimson hair across pale naked shoulders quickly burn into flames of the swords that clashed, the magic that spilled over across the field of Heaven, and blood poured like rain upon the Earth in those days. The Clash of Angels was and is still the most epic of battles. No amount of bodies upon the Earth’s soil can compare to the magnitude of loss that occurred during that great battle. Maxwell, alongside Lucifer and many others, were chained and cast from Heaven into a special pit far from the wonderful grace that is Heaven and God.

Maxwell remembered it well, the great battle and striking down his friends that had turned to the foe. As time passed, the irony of magical immortal energy beings trying to kill each other grew within him. He damned God, he damned others, but eventually he damned himself. He wasn’t alone, there were many other Fallen Angels, but he wasn’t like many of them that twisted and contorted into evil, horrible, and vile creatures punishing humankind. He and a small group took to a lighter pace of life, those like him chose to live amongst the humans they once stood up for and lost the grace of God for.

Keeping a journal, he logged every thought to pass the time. He knew he wasn’t like everyone else and he knew he was solitary in his existence amongst humankind. It was depressing to see once magnificent creatures, humans, turn against one another living with their emotions running amok and living for devious means. Greed, wrath, vanity, gluttony, and the rest were all human made creations and not of God themselves.

Night after night his heavy boots stomped the streets of New York, Tokyo, London, Paris, but he found a home in the City of Angels, another irony that wasn’t lost on him. Night after night he found himself reflecting upon his memories of better times and her, Lilith. Sitting upon the middle of the H on the Hollywood sign, his head tilted back and his eyes shut, it was exhausting prancing around the world using his energy to mask his demonic form.

“You’re thinking of her again, aren’t you Maxziel.” A low voice interrupted his rest from a black hovering mist. As the darkened mist moved closer it transformed into a human wearing a long black trench coat, jeans, boots, and a white shirt mirroring Max’s own apparel. “I’ve lost count on how long it has been, but you eventually have got to stop thinking about her. No one has heard from her in countless centuries. She just stopped existing. If she had changed planes of existence we would’ve heard something.” The man then kicked Maxwell’s boot to get his attention.

Max’s eyes finally opened and stared across from him at the other Fallen Angel, “She couldn’t have just stopped existing, that’s now it works. Perhaps her soul went elsewhere? Azriel, she’s in the world, I just don’t know where. She can’t just be simply lost to time and space. God doesn’t do that, they don’t work that way.”

The scene continued into him finding Adele, but I removed all this and started over, this isn’t unheard of for me to do. What I had written didn’t feel right and I had shelved the entire project until I decided to start over. I do like how this scene showed a love/hate of the Fallen Angels, but I didn’t like how Azriel wasn’t more aggressive. I saw him as a forceful type of being, an in your face ‘admit it’ type.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

The Interviewer is a mysterious figure that has contact with the characters of The Blasphemer Series and thus interviews them time to time. In this interview you will see them interacting with Imogene, a female character from book two Harvest. Imogene is a gifted Seer of the Present.

This particular interview happened before tragic events that unfolded in The Blasphemer Series. To understand better it is recommended you read The Blasphemer Series: Harvest.


The Interviewer: When you’re introduced into the book you’re struggling with withdrawals, do you wish you’d been introduced in a different way?

Imogene: It’s how the story went. I can’t change it or how I was living my life at the time. You’d try and find an escape too if you have my curse they call a gift.

The Interviewer: Can you share with us something we may not know about you?

Imogene: I liked cheesecake and coffee.

The Interviewer: Is there anything that upset you about the book?

Imogene: It seems I was almost forgotten except for Margot and Isiah. I miss him.

The Interviewer: Will we see you in future books?

Imogene: Perhaps. Not all of the stories have been told yet. It’s up to the author to discover a way to bring me back into the fold. I’m not sure how I would or my purpose. It’s not like I had much of one in the first place.

The Interviewer: Well that’s just not true. A lot of people like you. They wanted to know about you, your relationship with Isiah, and some even asked the author to do a book of just you. As a side-story type of thing.

Imogene: Interesting. It’d be interesting to see what the author would have to say about me in a side-story book. What would that even be called? A companion novel?

The Interviewer: Yes, that’s what those books would be called. So, Imogene, we know what happens near the end of the book. So is there something you wish all the readers knew that perhaps got left out of the story?

Imogene: There is something, but I’m not sure how well it would’ve done. You see the writer writes in a certain style that may leave out things. If the main character can’t witness it then sometimes it doesn’t make it in. It’s a mix of third-person narration and first-person. I’ve personally never seen a book written like it. I wish she would’ve left how I fought hard. How even when ingested I was kicking, screaming, and fighting.

The Interviewer: Do you feel you were given no justice?

Imogene: In some ways yes and in some ways no. I don’t want to really go into it. There’s nothing that can be done now.

The Interviewer: Since you’re on the other side is there any knowledge you can give us that those still living may not know?

Imogene: There’s a spy among them, but he’ll get his. He’ll flip and ultimately help them.

The Interviewer: Will you say who?

Imogene: I’m not allowed to.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you’d like to say to the remaining Seers, Briar and Dante?

Imogene: Dante’s going to be just fine. I am not allowed to say too much, but without him the world would truly fall apart. Briar is in good hands even though she doesn’t realize it, being possessed by anyone else would destroy her.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you’d like to say to readers or potential readers?

Imogene: I’m gone, I pass in this book. That’s no secret, but what many don’t know is I can now live on because of them. The author’s a bit weird, but she has done good by me by telling my story. If you read it I can live on in your memory and thoughts. I do hope you’ll read it. Please read.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you wish to say perhaps to Margot or Isiah if they read this interview?

Imogene: I am sorry Margot. I did love you and still do. You didn’t have to take me in and you did. You were a mother to me and I never appreciated you. To Isiah, I guess I’d say, I miss and love you.


Margot has gotten to read the interview and it helped her with her mourning. Isiah was too busy to read it. Read The Blasphemer Series: Harvest when it re-releases to understand all of this better.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

The Interviewer is a mysterious figure that has contact with the characters of The Blasphemer Series and thus interviews them time to time. In this interview you will see them interacting with Maxwell, a the main male character of the book Maxwell Demon from The Blasphemer Series.

This particular interview has a history that it happened to be ‘found’ in the ‘archives’ from The Alexandrian vaults. It takes place after the first book published. No-one knows where it came from or who The Interviewer is.


The Interviewer: How do you feel about your story being chronicled for mass readers to get a hold of and read?

Maxwell: I think the story must be told. It’s an important endeavor to open your mind to a new possibly.

The Interviewer: What do you think of L. Bachman being the one to write your story and the stories of others?

Maxwell: She’s alright, she’s good people. I like her tattoos.

The Interviewer: Whatever happened to Eshu?

Maxwell: :chuckles: Gabriel took care of him about as much as someone like Eshu could be taken care of. You must understand Eshu is a guardian and a very powerful spiritual being. He learned his lesson, which is all I can say about that.

The Interviewer: What’s your biggest regret?

Maxwell: In the book, it’s listed as never getting to Lilith in time, but truth be it there is a bigger regret that I have and that is defying The Mother and The Father.

The Interviewer: You witnessed reincarnation first hand with following Lilith through her many lives, what were the best life and the worse that you saw her go through?

Maxwell: The worse life she lived I witnessed for a brief period was that of her as a child. You must think of things in the time frame of which they happened. At one time in history to be red haired was thought of as a bad thing, a sign of a witch. We all know that Witches come in all shapes, colors, backgrounds, and countries, but in this particular life she had been hidden away for a very long time. Her hair had been sooted and changed colors with dyes of the time. In the end, she had been murdered by a mob worried she was going to bring bad upon the land.

The best life she lived I can remember was that of peace. She was in Scotland living on the outskirts. Her hovel overlooked a valley and a river. It was quiet and peaceful. Sadly, like most of her lives she had either been killed or died tragically in ways I couldn’t do anything about. In this one, she had gotten sick and died. I couldn’t heal her. When she saw me for the smallest of moments I could swear she recognized me, but by the time I had gotten to her she had been sick for a very long time. I still don’t know what she died of.

The Interviewer: We only get a taste of a few of her lives, can you elaborate on others? Why is it so hard for you to find her? The compass worked in the published account why not just do that earlier?

Maxwell: She had been a male in several lives, a warrior or soldier that led to her death in those lives. She had been just about anything you could be, must remember she had been around a very…very long time. A monk, a cult leader, a housewife, and even a school teacher are a few that are coming to mind. She’s been every color variation, a wide range of ages in her lives, and involved in most religions.

I simply hadn’t thought about making a compass, the idea never came to mind until later years after struggling for many lifetimes of never finding her. I had my own struggles as well giving me problems and diverting me. Goodwitch Anya also found out about me and contacted me. Things went smoother after that.

The Interviewer: Have you spent more time on Earth since the book has been released?

Maxwell: I have no comment.

The Interviewer: Your Enochian tattoos, how do they work? I’ve read that some, that got early copies of the story, wished they had a compass like yours.

Maxwell: :chuckles: Yes, I can see how a compass would work for many. Simply having something right there literally on your hand pointing you to whomever or whatever you need. I can’t begin reveal the magic of my etchings, I got in trouble once before for sharing too much knowledge with mankind.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you wish could’ve left into the story that was taken out?

Maxwell: The story written was specific, it was to launch a series that would talk and discuss many other lives and others stories. This one was specific to me finding Lilith, but I have plenty of stories. Perhaps she’ll write them down as well in a book for others. I have dealt with Raphaim, Canaanites, and have stories upon stories I’d love to share.

The Interviewer: What do you see happening with The Blasphemer Series?

Maxwell: There is a great evil coming. There are many stories to tell.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

Throughout my life various people told me I should be a writer, but I was also drawn to art and that was the direction my life took for many years. I married a music teacher and decided to become a teacher myself, and the logical choice was art. I taught that for several years. I finally gave it up, but I didn’t give up my love for art. Now I have my own home-based business called L’Artista bella. I consider myself a portrait artist, but I’ve been branching out more, trying to teach myself new techniques, to grow as an artist.

I never lost my interest in writing, though. It was just put on the back burner for a while because life happened. To say I thought I always had a book in me sounds cliché, but that’s how I finally became a writer. I’ve always had an interest in the paranormal and many books I enjoy reading are paranormal, so I began writing in that genre. I’ve always had vivid dreams and I like
to analyze them. I had one that was so strange I couldn’t get it off my mind so I wrote it down. It finally led me to the idea for my first novel, “Keys Of Childish Scrawl.” The book wasn’t born, though, for several years.

I finally decided to sit down one day a few years ago and start writing that book I’d thought about for so long. It ended up taking a totally different direction than what I first envisioned, but I believe it turned out the way it was meant to be. I also included many of my own life experiences in it. For instance, one day while driving home from work in the hills, I got caught in a freak snow storm. I didn’t have experience driving in those weather conditions, so to say I was nervous is an understatement. While in a deserted area, I came upon a snow owl perched on a fence post, and it was watching me as though it was waiting for me. We made eye contact as I drove by and the scene was surreal. It looked like a ghost in the snow. That white owl was included in my book as an important part of the story. When I began writing my book, I didn’t think about having it published. I just wanted to show myself that I could write one. As it developed, I began to think seriously about having it published, and by the time I finished, I was determined to do that.

Publishing can be a long drawn out process, and sometimes people go through many publishers before their work is accepted. Some people are never published unless they self- publish, and even that never happens for some. I feel my experience isn’t typical and I feel very blessed. On the spur of the moment one day my husband, David, suggested we go to a comic-con in Paragould, AR. Neither of us had ever been to one so we were curious. I had also just gotten a rejection letter from the 2nd publishing company I submitted to. The 1st one didn’t even acknowledge me.

When we walked into the comic con, the first table we saw was Burning Willow Press Publishing Co., and we stopped and talked for several minutes. I was impressed with the owners and publishers, Edd and Kindra Sowder, and they encouraged me to submit my book, and they accepted it. I believe it was meant to be, and as the saying goes 3 rd time was the charm. “Keys Of Childish Scrawl,” was released March 2, and can be found on Amazon.

While waiting for my first book to be published I didn’t stop writing. I’ve written short stories for BWP anthologies that were also accepted. Those stories are “The Light In The Window,” “Highway 93,” and “Grandpa’s Glasses.” I’ve written a spin-off of my novel that continues the lives of two of the characters, and I’m working on a third book now with the same characters. Their story develops, and you get to learn more about the meaning of the white owl. I’ve also gotten story ideas from some of my paintings.

  • On writing, the greatest lesson I’ve learned from it is that I still have a lot more to learn. As I said about developing techniques in art, there’s always room for growth as a writer. I’m branching out with my writing and experimenting with different genres to help me grow.
  • Constructive criticism should always be welcomed too, because it’s a new perspective on your story or your writing style. Revision is extremely important.
  • Your first draft is just getting the story down, but there should be many drafts before you decide you are finished and submit anything. Every time I go over something I’ve written, I always rewrite part of it, add something new, or delete something I decide doesn’t work or is completely unnecessary. It just makes the story better.

I’ve wondered how long I’ll write. Well, who knows? But as long as I have story ideas, I’ll be writing. That could be a while because I keep coming up with new stories, many of which stem from my own life experiences.

Check Cindy Johnson’s Links

www.facebook.com/cindyjohnsonauthor

www.goodreads.com/user/show/69812811-cindy-johnson

/twitter.com/CindyJo…/status/1069584124824956928…

www.facebook.com/LArtista-bella-1390856007846946/

amazon.com/author/cindyj

Some links contained in the above interview may no longer work properly. Images may have been lost over the years as well for some interviews and older content.

This is an older interview being re-posted.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

My name is Katie, and I’ve been an author my entire adult life. I published my first novel in 2006 with a large mainstream publisher. In 2009 my second came out with another. Five more followed, and everything seemed set.

But by 2015, everything had changed. eBooks had been a thing for some time, and book sales were down across the board – even for bestsellers. The big publishing companies had chosen to invest heavily in the eBook market, a move which did not pay off as well as they likely hoped it would, as many readers decided the format did not suit them and for some “electronic books” appeared to have been nothing but a passing fad. On top of that Amazon had cornered the eBook market and few other platforms survived for long. By now hemorrhaging money, the “Big Five” stopped renewing contracts with many of their mid-level authors and many editors and other publishing professionals lost their jobs.

I was one of the many people to lose out. In 2015 both of my publishers told me they weren’t going to publish the next installment in the series I had begun in 2009. I was effectively out on the street with a half-published series, fans asking when the next book would be out and an agent shrugging helplessly as every other mainstream possibility turned us down on the grounds that they did not want to pick up a series halfway through (or in one case, went into receivership before they’d even read the manuscript).

I had no idea what to do, so I turned to my friends. Their advice – go indie.

There has long been something of a class system in the publishing world, which to my regret I must confess I once ascribed to myself. “Real” authors got their books out through big shiny corporate publishing companies and that’s it. Self-publishing was for untalented losers who couldn’t take no for an answer. Indie publishing was for cults and conspiracy theorists. Certainly, when I became an indie author several people I had thought were friends suddenly began acting as if I didn’t exist, or began making passive-aggressive remarks about my “failed” career.

But the landscape has changed and is still changing. If those stereotypes were ever so they no longer are. I entered the independent publishing world hopelessly naïve and unsure of what I was getting into, and as it is in any business I learned a few painful lessons along the way. What I found was a world where many others are still finding their feet, but were, for the most part, everything was less impersonal, and there was far more creative freedom. The companies I’ve begun working with are not owned by faceless bean counters, but by other artists, for artists. There’s less money invested, of course, but in some ways, that’s a good thing. Too much money on the line makes any company overly conservative and averse to taking risks, which is why so much mainstream fiction tends to be rather samey – blockbuster movies even more so. Diversity is encouraged and there is far less preferential treatment shown toward white male authors, which was an issue I had to deal with many times as a mainstream author. The experience is more collaborative, and as the author, you feel less like a supplicant and more like a partner.

Some people are now declaring that independent publishing is the way of the future, and perhaps it is. Time, as always, will tell.  I for one am optimistic.

Check out KJ Taylor:

Some links contained in the above interview may no longer work properly. Images may have been lost over the years as well for some interviews and older content.

This is an older piece of content being re-posted.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

Writers seldom write the things they think. They simply write the things they think other folks think they think. So this is my two cents; one man’s opinion – I think.

I follow a fair number of writers and creators on social media and noticed some of them discuss their creative process a lot more than I do. I’m fairly reluctant to talk about the fundamentals of storytelling and the various projects I have in development (mainly because I have no idea what the hell I’m doing, anyway), but I feel it’s healthy to step out of my comfort zone every once in a while. So here we go.

One of the first things they teach you about creative writing is that there are five basic elements of a story: characterization, setting, plot, theme, and tone (these can vary depending on how big of an alcoholic your instructor is). A story cannot exist without any of them. You can try to remove setting by placing the characters in a void…but then the setting becomes the void. You can try to remove plot by just having everyone standing around doing nothing…then the plot becomes them standing around doing nothing. You can try to remove characterization…well, you get the idea.

To construct a story you have to make a decision about what one of those elements will be and then build up from there. I like to think of a story as a tower and all of these elements are your building blocks to create it. The bottom block is the most important as it will answer the question “why.” Why is this story important to tell? Why do you want to tell it?

Personally, I believe the most important aspect of a story is theme. It is the central tenant to which every other element can rally around. It gives my story a purpose. A punch. That said, it doesn’t have to be. There are plenty of stories that don’t start with a theme at all. Comedies, for example, are more interested in tone, as they want to set up a good laugh. Romance novels might be more focused on characterization, as they want to see their protagonist fall in love or triumph over a heartbreak. Sometimes setting is the most important factor, such as in a period piece or a story built around a particular event.

Now even though this first block might be the most important, it is also probably the easiest to develop. Because it’s your “why”, the work is already done for you. It’s your driving force behind wanting to develop a project. The trick to a good story are the blocks that come after. The ones you have to creatively mold in order to flesh out your tale. And it’s not just what you’re choosing to put in those blocks that matter. It’s also the order in which you stack them in. Since each block is built upon the last, if you realize too late that one of those blocks was a bad choice, then the others that came after it will also be affected. This process is supposed to be fun. Writing is a crazy endeavor. People isolate themselves for vast periods of time while staring at a screen, banging on a keyboard, and wrestling with their own thoughts. But we do it because it’s enjoyable! The minute this painful process starts to become…you know…actually painful…then stop, change out a couple blocks, and see what fits better. Maybe the setting should be in space instead of the Wild West. Maybe it should be a horror instead of an adventure. Maybe the main character should be a boy instead of a girl. Or you could just do what I do whenever a story doesn’t seem to be working: add zombies.

Check out Frank Martin:

Digital Camera

I am from north east Arkansas. After college and moving around many years I returned to the area. My career was in music and music education. It remains a major interest for me. Science fiction and some fantasy tales held my interests from childhood. I got to view many of the 50’s grade B sci-fi flicks as they first came out. As a teen I enjoyed several of the genre’s short stories.

My writing experience is regarding graduate schools and career needs. My preference is the Chicago Manual style. So, I would certainly urge all aspiring authors to learn the fundamentals of writing/language usage.

Next, writers should expose themselves to the wide variety of styles that exist. I think that, as in my chosen field of music, the more styles you can be versed in the better your chances of success. It hurts nobody to read a poem or two, some old/new style novels and short stories, and folk tales of various cultures. I believe everyone should read some of the Psalms in the Bible. David and Asaph were great in that style and knew how to write expressively.

I told myself the stories I have published several times in my head before I wrote them. Inspiration comes from different places for all of us. I have composed two novels that need revising, of course! The first began with a scene that came to mind while on a long walk during a winter night. Colors and sound often grab my attention. I envisioned a snowy scene of a bright blue flag, the image panned downward to a line of people with a primitive and brassy fanfare sounding. Then I began wondering: who were they, why were they there, where were they, and why? The second book built on the first.

Most places and characters I use are based on who/what I know. My first story, “The Night at Amos James’ Cabin”, is rooted in a family story passed to me by my maternal grandmother.

The second one. “Glork”, reflects my interest in what would happen if alien visitors desired to become Christian. Something would surely go wrong, and it does.

Write so that you show what is happening, rather than just telling it.

Study some history like the events you wish to write about. I can’t imagine writing on warfare without knowing about the World Wars and the Civil War, etc.

Write a lot. Consider it as practice, which everyone needs.

Finally, find an editor you trust, as well as accurate beta readers. Edd Sowder of Burning Willow Press has been such an editor for me, and one of our sons, Ben, is a creative writing graduate and helps when needed. My wife, Cindy, is also a valuable “sounding board”. It is often mentioned to not use family in
such projects, but since mine have the credentials, I do not mind doing so.

Check Out David Online:

Amazon Author Page

Many people struggle with writing, I get it sometime it gets hard, but never give up! Here is a list on how to improve your storytelling! These are tips I have shared for years to help everyone wanting to write stories or even improve their literary role-playing and storytelling. It’s time to bust out your thesaurus or your online dictionaries for what they were meant for!


5. Research

The saying goes: write what you know. I agree fully, but what about everyone else that love writing new things, things they may not know? To that I say: write what you know because research will teach you. If you’re unsure of something fully exhaust yourself researching about a subject. Of course, go fully legal in your research and harm no one.

4. Comparing

The best way for a writer to explain something is to compare it to something more familiar. Recently, I wrote a short story and inside of it I described a UFO as a ‘silver donut’ Seems very simple, but you now know exactly what I’m talking about right.

It’s good to be descriptive, but sometimes simple gets the job done. If you’re writing descriptively enough throughout the story comparing something unfamiliar to something that is recognizable is a great way for the reader to see in their mind what you’re trying to convey.

3. Know Your Characters/World

The best way to write a character or world is to fully flush them out. It may be tedious, but it can help very much during writing. This is also where the jokes authors make of ‘my character wouldn’t let me’ or ‘they told me how they felt’ come in. It’s from, I hope, them flushing out personalities, histories, and all of that before hand.

Ask yourself questions and answer them. Who is this man or woman? Did they overcome what they went through? Did it damage them in anyway? This is also good for world building.

Fully flush out everything, enough of everything at least. I’ve met writers that have gone above and beyond creating interesting worlds and some that have done enough.

2. Pull From Your Own Emotions

This seems easy enough, but sometimes isn’t utilized properly. I have become well known for my ’emotionally driven writing style’ and the secret is this. If I’m writing something more horrific than what I’ve been through I use how I felt to write what it is and try and add upon it.

For example: I’ve never been possessed, but I’ve written about it (Human Ouija, The Blasphemer Series: Harvest, and The Painting of Martel depict different styles of possession). I imagine the worse possible feelings I’ve gone through, wrote them, and then thought more about the character’s situation. Feeling invaded, feeling overwhelmed, and perhaps confused.

1. Remember Your Five Aristotelian Senses

The key to really pulling someone into your story and improving your own writing is remembering the 5 ‘traditional’ senses (also known as the Five Aristotelian Senses). These are touch, taste, hearing, seeing, and smell.

Ask yourself questions.

Touch/Feeling – Is it cold? How does this character feel about that? Can they feel the warmth of their coat or perhaps they feel the chill because they’re not properly dressed. Perhaps your character has picked up something, how did that object feel. You can even describe simply if it was heavy or lighter than expected.

Tasting – Is the food salty or sweet? Did that cause them to moan enjoying the flavor? Say they were hit in the mouth, what did the taste of the blood against the taste buds of their tongue taste like? Perhaps they expected something to taste delicious because it appeared that way, but sadly it was disgusting. You can describe the disgusting flavors, why it was disgusting to that character. How did the food look before they tasted it?

Hearing – If the scene is ‘quiet’ can the character hear the buzzing of the air against their eardrums? Perhaps they do and it’s interrupted by a sudden noise. How did they react to it? Was it a familiar sound of another character coming home or a stranger breaking in? Did they hear glass shattering of a window or a door’s wood breaking when it was kicked in?

Seeing – So much of the story can be based on what is seen or describing a scene in such a way the reader can see it too. Things can be bright, blinding bright, or dark and dim. It is, for me, one of the first descriptors as it puts color to the moment.

Smelling – Smell is said to be the strongest of our senses linked to memories. They can take us to our grandmother’s house because she baked a lot or even to a sad memory of losing someone. For example: After a funeral many bring food to the family that has lost someone. Perhaps in this situation your character cannot stand the smell of pies because they remember losing their mother.

There are all kinds of scents. Sweet, nasty, or something that reminds me of our favorite memories. Apply those to your writing. Did the apple smell delicious or has it rot? You can even mix smelling with feeling and go the route of the air smelt clean and cold. You see? Mixing the senses creates a dynamic surrounding for your character and will add to the world they’re in.

You can even go into how the smell made your character feel. Did the burger joint’s smells make your character hungry or sick because it was overpowering? Use this!

There are more senses, you can learn about them here and here. I recommend this as it can help even further!


YOUR TURN

What did you think? Did this help? Have anything to add to the list above? Do you want me to do more examples? Perhaps show these tips in action?

This book is a shameless plug, but it’s a book. Maxwell Demon is the first book in my series The Blasphemer Series. The synopsis is merely the squishing down summarizing of how deep this story goes. When writing it I cried, I laughed, and really enjoyed the process that, for most writers, is never seen, but if written right the readers can pick up emotionally. The reviews say I wrote it well, but I leave it up to you, the person that may pick up the novella, to determine if you enjoyed my writing style.

This book in my words is a story about a fallen angel that fell in love with the first woman, Lilith, and fought in the Clash of Angels, but on the wrong side. He didn’t accept his punishment, being sent to Hell and the mutilation of his wings, and found himself a way back to Earth. He learned that Lilith too was punished but with reincarnation forever to live and die until she learns why she was punished. He believes if he can find her and help her learn then he can prove redemption and forgiveness is possible, even for her.

His has found her many times, but always too late. He has seen the soulmate die many times and in many ways. This book is her last life recorded, he learns that she will be given no more lives and she will be doomed to Hell, the place for the truly unforgivable. Maxwell goes to Hell when she is kidnapped, he goes through a mythical fantasy realm full of fairies, talking trees, and mythical creatures, and Earth to help her.

It’s more of a dark fantasy story with horror elements than a horror piece. There are references to so many creatures, here’s a small list of them that are in this book and this series:

  • Angels
  • Demons
  • Vampires
  • Werewolves
  • Fallen Angels
  • Witches
  • Fairies
  • Talking Trees
  • Unicorns
  • Boogeyman
  • Ghosts/Spirits

Synopsis:

Maxwell, an angel who fell from Heaven for his part in the corruption of mankind walks a plane of uncertainty on Earth. He was unwilling to fully accept his damnation, so he set out on a mission to save the soul of the woman he loves, Lilith. Now, more than a millennium has passed, and this is his last chance to save her and prove that no one soul is beyond redemption. 
From the gates of Heaven to the fires of Hell he has traveled to save her. He is bound to her by his heart and he will face the ones he once called brothers to rescue her. He will complete this mission.

She is now known as Adele, with no remembrance of him, their love, her betrayal, and it is up to him to show her that her life is worth more than she could ever imagine. He rediscovers why he fell in love with her and along the way, wages war against Hells greatest demons to remind her.

Who is destined to die? Who is destined to live? Who is the real enemy? Is one soul worth the world?

This poet, along with the writer Mary Shelly, was one of the first I’d ever heard about that really stuck with me. I am a big Edgar Allan Poe fan, with HP Lovecraft really being the only one to rival my love of his work. When I began practicing my artistic skills he also became one of the first portraits I’d work with over and over.

His poetry always called to me, as if his sorrows were the most relatable to me. I came across him at a young age, it wasn’t the dark love poetry, but the sadness and calling that came across to me the most. He’s an emotional poet.

Synopsis:

This book contains tales and poems by Edgar Allan Poe that became innovative literature discoveries at the time and extremely popular in its genre: The Fall of the House Usher, The Gold-Bug, the poem The Raven. Edgar Poe was one of the first American writers who wrote mostly novellas. Within twenty years Edgar Poe created two short novels, two poems, one play, about seventy stories, find poems and ten essays that were published in magazines and almanacs and then gathered in collection books. Edgar Poe was highly valued by Jules Verne, Arthur Conan Doyle and Howard Phillips Lovecraft who admitted his pioneer role in the genres they were popularizing.