Tag Archives: horror

2020 Book Review: Dracula by Bram Stoker

This is undoubtably a horror classic that has spawned a ship of a thousand novels. Dracula has spawned movies, television shows, and books with romantic vampires and oceans of times. Dark, sexy, and ominous this book without hesitation made the list for reviewing and just in time for Halloween. Unlike the many books, television, and even movies it is a slow read. It grasps you and pulls you deeper into it with the formatted style of diary and journal selections. The only movie version that has ever captured the book visually for me is the 1992 film Bram Stoker’s Dracula with actors Gary Oldman, Keanu Reeves, and Winona Ryder. Of course the movie differs from the book it still captured the darkness I envisioned in my imagination from the book.
Dracula is without a doubt one of my favorite reads and one of the few books I’ve ever read and re-read many times since I was young. My original copy has been gone for a long time, but I regained a copy years ago and kept it safe since. It’s a slow burn and is a book that must be read over many nights, yes at night. This is a must read during the night book as it best sets the tone of which the world is set. Maybe it’s my mind making the world of vampires and darkness romantic yet horrifying to recommend that it be read at night, but that’s how I read it.
The book may not be the best to read for those that want quick action or to get deep into an adventure quickly, since its told through journal entries and letters it takes time to get into. So for that it’s not the best book for someone who can’t give the book the time it deserves to enjoy. I could easily get into the theories of where the idea for the story spawned, how the writer was considered being a homosexual writing by the inspiration of his lover or even the connection to famous female author Mary Shelley, but these are, I think for now, best reserved for another post down the road.


This review is a part of my 2020 yearlong self-challenge to read and review. I have reread some books for the purpose of reviewing them on my website whereas I have read others for the first time. Check out Book Reviews and Recommendations to find other book reviews, book recommendations, and more information about the books I’m reading, have read, or are sharing.

Have you read this book? What were your thoughts? Do you agree with me? Do you disagree? Let’s have a conversation about it.


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The Veil: The Jersey Devil

The story begins with a woman name Jane Leeds and great mother Leeds had already given birth to twelve children, but upon finding that she was pregnant for a thirteenth she cursed the child. She called it the devil and wished it would be taken by the devil. Upon the night this child was born it stormed, and it introduced the world to the Leeds Devil.

The legend described the birth as violent, with the baby ripping from her and flying around the room before escaping out of a door/open window. An alternative version says the baby beat everyone in the room with its tail before escaping up the chimney and out into the world. Another version says that Leeds was the mother, but the devil himself was the father. Both versions I’m aware of describe a priest going into the Pine Barrens to perform an exorcism. There are two versions of the story that I can tell, but there are many subs-versions that combined the details of two separate tellings mixing them around and telling alternative versions. 

Upon deeper research for this post, I discovered a third story version that says that Leeds was punished by a higher power for having a child out of wedlock with a British soldier, an enemy of the country during the Revolutionary War.

Some folklorists had identified mother Leeds as Deborah Leeds, on grounds that Deborah Leeds’ husband, Japhet Leeds, named twelve children in the will he wrote during 1736, which is compatible with the legend. Deborah and Japhet Leeds also lived in the Leeds Point section of what is now Atlantic County, New Jersey, which is commonly the location of the Jersey Devil story. One theory says that the story of Mother Leeds, rather than being based on a single historical person, originated from colonial southern New Jersey religion-political disputes that became the subject of folklore and gossip among the local population. 

According to the theorist, folk legends concerning these historical disputes evolved through the years and ultimately resulted in the modern popular legend of the Jersey Devil during the early 20th century. It contends that “colonial-era political intrigue” involving early New Jersey politicians, Benjamin Franklin, and Franklin’s rival almanac publisher Daniel Leeds resulted in the Leeds family being described as “monsters”, and it was Daniel Leeds’ negative description as the “Leeds Devil”, rather than any actual creature, that created the later legend of the Jersey Devil.
It’s an interesting and more rooted of the story, but the eyewitness accounts are not of a Daniel Leeds and him being a monster and of something very different.

The Jersey Devil is often described as a flying biped with hooves, but there are many variations. The common description is that of a bipedal kangaroo-like or wyvern-like creature with a horse- or goat-like head, leathery bat-like wings, horns, small arms with clawed hands, legs with cloven hooves, and a forked tail. It has been reported to move quickly and is often described as emitting a high-pitched blood-curdling scream.

With many legends dealing with crypto zoological creatures, there have been many hoaxes with people faking ‘hoof prints’ and claiming to find them in the area The Jersey Devil calls home. There seems to be details even pointing to an actual manhunt for the creature by President James Monroe in which the claim that the devil was in fact found and killed by a man named Commodore Stephen Decatur, but there’s no hard evidence that I can find that proves this manhunt even happened. For me, this story of the devil being found and killed seems to be just a story to calm the nerves of locals or even as a bragging-rights type of tale.

With, all the information that is out there about The Jersey Devil, I recommend you doing your own research as I have purposely left much out to shorten the post. It’s a interesting story with historical ties.

Continue reading The Veil: The Jersey Devil

The Veil: The Wampus Cat

It’s getting closer to a very spooky day, so let’s talk about The Wampus Cat. A good deal of may never have heard of it, but that doesn’t mean the legend is less real. This is an Appalachian supernatural beast with its very roots in Cherokee tales. From what I understand, the legend begins with a Native American/Indigenous hunting tribe are about to embark on a long hunting trip. They allowed no women to accompany them as it would be too dangerous and rough on them, so they were to be left behind.

The story continues that during this trip that one woman from the village went alone, anyway. She covered herself in the hide of a mountain cat, cougar, or mountain lion. She spied on the men as they asked forgiveness for what they were about to do, taking lives of animals, but also thanking them for their lives. The woman was so enthralled she stepped back breaking a stick. This stirred the hunters and ultimately they took her back to the village to let the shaman of the tribe decide her fate. The shaman turned her into the animal she wore the hide of, a mountain cat.

There are different variations of the story I know online interesting reads. One variation is that the woman was the wife of one hunter and the other was a spirit that transformed into a woman to follow them. One of the more interesting variations is that the woman was cursed to walk alone for being a witch dating the legend to a different time period altogether. 

It is said the Wampus Cat is forever to roam the Appalachian Mountains at night and some have claimed to see it. The tales are all different, as mentioned above, but primarily that it is a woman that roams the night as a half-cougar half-woman as a punishment of some sort. This is primarily a North Carolina crypto animal and tale. 

Folklorist have dated the tale going back to the 19th century with a 20th century twist turning it into a Native American woman.  In 1964 reports of a ‘ape-like’ creature seen roaming the woods came to light and they labeled it the Wampus Cat, but ‘ape-like’ and ‘cougar-like’ are very different descriptions. It is said that you know you have a Wampus Cat near if in the middle of the night you hear odd cat-like meowing or growling or if animals have disappeared from local farms. 

The term ‘catawampus’ in the south to refer to something being ‘odd’ or ‘strange’ is said to come from this legend. I’ve even used this term to describe something messed up, for example: the room was clean until the kid ran through now it’s all catawampus.

Continue reading The Veil: The Wampus Cat

Melankholia, All of My Every Things, and Harvest Updates & Reveals

Last weekend the digital version of Melankholia released, but as planned the paperback edition released on October 5th, how exciting. Along with this wonderful news, I made a small announcement. The announcement was about All of My Every Things will have a second edition run with additional poetry and the long awaited paperback edition, but before the second edition will release and the website posts about that let’s take time to appreciate that a second poetry book has been released.

Melankholia

This book is now live in digital and in paperback formats. It is the first book of poetry that I’ve branded with the Edkar logo. To learn more about Edkar read Edkar Press where I explain more about this organization method I’m using, i.e. publishing house. I have previously mentioned Melankholia on the website read What is Melankholia?

Melankholia has some selected poetry from All of My Every Things included near the end, as well as poetry written from this year’s Napowrimo back in April 2020, and a lot of recent works I’ve polished up for publication. All of this beautiful hard work is introduced by Oliver Sheppard. An amazing poet in his own right and I recommend checking out his work. My favorite is Thirteen Nocturnes.


All of My Every Things

All of My Every Things was previously published last year. It was a simple digital release with plans of a paperback release to follow, but never sitting well with me, I quietly postponed it, but finally with some polishing and adding additional poetry the paperback is coming. I have gone in and updated the book.


Harvest

Harvest is coming out as a re-release November 24th, 2020 with the publisher Three Furies Press. This is just a reminder that it will mark the continuation of The Blasphemer Series with the book following Ghosts, coming out 2021 around August if everything stays on course.

[Brief Words] Interview of Ramona Mainstrom

Ramona Mainstrom is one fantastic writer covering several genres and bringing forward a multitude of books. This interesting author gave me some of her time earlier this year. I gathered a list of questions and she was kind enough to answer them, below is the interaction. This is not a interview to skip over!


Tell us a little about yourself.

I’m a full-time author and solo parent of two kids, ages 7 & 8. I enjoy acting and singing. I’m often dancing around the house and enjoy puttering around the garden with my neighbour.

What genre (s) do you write in?

Fantasy (Urban, Epic, and Dark), Thriller, and Horror.

For most, they began writing at a young age, taking writing more seriously later in life. Is this a sentiment that can apply to you? What was it like for you?

I was discouraged from writing or reading for pleasure, so becoming a writer wasn’t an option in my reality for a while. It was rough. I don’t know how to explain how having a part of your Self forbidden.

I was a story-teller as a child and as soon as I learned how to write words, I started writing stories. In high school, I wrote short stories, poems, scripts and started a few longer stories.

I didn’t consider writing as a career option until I was an adult and only because of peer pressure. Friends got a hold of some of my scenes and short stories and insisted I finish them. That’s how I started writing the Touch of Insanity series, but Eyes of the Hunter was the first stand alone book I completed.

How much time do you spend writing?

No clue. I’m a bit of a workaholic, but I’m also a multi-tasker. So, I’ll be at my desk for hours, but I’ll be writing a book, answering messages, homeschooling my kids, doing groceries online, and editing a different book.

 I just flow. If I start to stress about when, how long, or how many words, it kills the joy and creativity. I don’t put pressure on myself for deadlines or word counts. I need writing to be enjoyable. I need the words to flow naturally, so I let it happen when and how it wants while I go about taking care of the rest of my day.

What has been the most eye-opening part of publishing for you?

At the beginning, it was learning how traditional publishing works. It was very discouraging. Being an indie author taught me so much, but I think it also made me a better client once I was with a publisher.

Do you have a favorite character that you have written? If so, who? And what makes them so special.

Hands down; Santa in Sleigh Ride. Taking this epitome of kindness and generosity and giving him a hard edge made him more lovable to me. He’s avenging the benign creatures under his care who were injured or killed by dark forces. He’s racing, for not just his own life, but to preserve the beauty of Christmas and everyone who works with him.

Pitting him against the older, harsher Christmas representations in a death race let me show a dark and ruthless side of Santa. There’s a point in the story where his co-pilot, Jack Frost says, “People will get hurt” and Santa replies, “I’m counting on it.”

That gives me the chills. Every. Time. Santa is going to mess folk up to protect his people and keep the spirit of Christmas alive. He’s selling his soul for others to have that magic.

Do you ever write traits or characters inspired by people you know?

Always! It’s how I keep my characters real. Would so-and-so do this? How would they react? What’s their speech pattern like?

Where do your ideas come from?

Everything. Everywhere. There are a million stories in my world every day. People are lovely inspirations. Beautiful, complex, predictable yet chaotically unpredictable in all their messy glory.

 Real life is a non-stop Plot Bunny that just keeps popping out babies. For years, I was told I should write about my life because it’s so wild. But, as fiction because no one would believe it really happened. So I’ve started using bits of my personal life into my stories. The Crossroad is actually a journal entry from my life. It was intended to be part of a non-fiction series, but . . . Well, a good paranormal story is fun to read.

 And, my other big inspiration is dreams. My dreams and nightmares are detailed and emotion-filled. They stay with me long after I wake and often inspire my stories. The Greatest of Books is a story based on my dreams.

What is your current writing about?

I’m currently releasing the Touch of Insanity series. It’s a 10 book fantasy series about a Half-Elf named Kharee, who was created to heal a goddess who is going mad and is spreading insanity via her connection to the people of the world, Besamie. Unfortunately, her parents withheld the ability for her to actually use her powers until they knew she’d grown up to be a decent, sane person.

The series follows Kharee as she discovers her powers, her mission, and her own truth. I’ve tried to keep the story as PG as possible, but she goes through some dark and gruesome experiences as she wades through the madness. For example, there are winged monsters called karpa that impregnate their prey and werewolves which are called Hydan Kin in their world, named after Hydan Speargood, the Elven Mage-Master who first contracted the magical disease. Oh, and of course a vampire lord, because no dark fantasy is complete without one.

I’ve been releasing a new book every 20th. Book 4, Each According Their Worth, releases on April 20th and I’m hoping to have a completed collection of all 10 books in one out in time for Christmas. If readers want to know when each book releases, they can sign up for Books2Read notifications .

It’s been very exciting to write and I’m so proud of the finish products.

Do you have any new series planned?

After the Touch of Insanity series, Three Furies Press will be releasing the Harper series. It’s a paranormal thriller about a psychic named Hannah Harper who has PTSD. She’s very quirky. Edges frighten her, so everything in her home is rounded. Going out is challenging because there are edges everywhere. She gets dragged into an investigation of serial killings and finds the guy, but ends up as his next target. As the series progresses, they discover the killer from the first book isn’t the only threat they have to worry about. I’m very excited about this series because it sneaks from “okay this is a paranormal story” to “OhEmGee! This is mind-bending paranormal and I’m scared now”. Or, it will be if I do it right.

What has being signed to a publisher meant for you as a writer, since many self-publish nowadays?

It was surprisingly cathartic. I’d given up on the idea of being picked up by a publisher and was content self-publishing. I really respect the women running Three Furies Press, so when I saw they were accepting submission and I actually had something in a genre they publish, I just had to submit Gifted, the first book of the Harper series.

Reading that I’d been accepted . . . I cried. Happy, ugly cry because people I respect  found value in my work.

What are you reading now?

I’m currently reading really interesting urban fantasy by Yvette Bostic, called Call of the Elements, which is the first book of her Magister’s Bane series. It’s really good.

About Rosa

Rosa Marchisella is a prolific author and the creator of the animated series, Zomb-Eh? Rosa also writes non-fiction under the name Rosa Arcade. She has written and co-authored over 50 publications, stories, screenplays, and scripts. Her poetry has been featured in anthologies and websites. Her other written works include 200+ articles, marketing and media projects, as well as promotional and educational tools.

Social Media Links

Website:                     www.RosaMarchisella.com

Facebook:                  www.facebook.com/iamrosa.fanpage

BookBub:                   www.bookbub.com/authors/rosa-marchisella

Books2Read:             https://books2read.com/ap/8Z2MY8/Rosa-Marchisella


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DELETED SCENES FROM THE BLASPHEMER SERIES: MAXWELL DEMON PART 2

Throughout the writing process, Maxwell Demon underwent many changes. I’ve shared that when I was back writing it I was just about finished and deleted the entire last chapter and part of the chapter before that one because it simply didn’t feel right. Along with this over time I have shared other things that have changed. This is part two of the two part post sharing some of these differences.

Some changes happened during professionally editing forever being lost for a great story and some never made it past the drafting phase. For readers, you may recognize names or scenes, but remember them differently or names being completely different from the version you read. Things change a lot during the writing process.

I hope you enjoy!


Deleted Scenes

In the book, the published work, there is a scene that’s dramatic of Adele being shown her past through what Maxwell had seen, but this scene was originally written earlier in the manuscript and took place in the backroom of the bar she was working and where Maxwell found her. It was so traumatic to her to be shown so much history, lives, and things that a human’s mind is not complex enough to understand it caused her nose to bleed.

Another scene that not only didn’t make it, but altered an entire character was one that involved Yeqon. He’s a manipulative character, but I couldn’t help but rewrite him as compassionate as well. A scene that got deleted was that of him battling Maxwell on the road. The final product as Kokabiel doing this, this is what felt right instead of Yeqon. Yeqon’s influence over others led, in the original scene, him glamouring other demons, not his own minions, to do things against their will.

Removed completely was Maxwell finding Adele in Hollywood, she originally had an apartment down the street from a bar she worked at. After the nosebleed and her sharing that she had felt followed with Maxwell he escorts her home so that she can gather things before they start traveling toward The Bishop’s home. Upon arriving at her apartment, Adele finds the door ajar, and her apartment is how she left it except a wooden box holding something very special to her was taken. Also upon entering,

Maxwell sees for a moment, Adele doesn’t see this, a shadowy demonic creature jumping out of the window. Adele shuts this window believing that she had forgotten it to close it before she left for work earlier in the evening.

Though I liked this scene, writing it was smooth, it began leading myself and characters into a direction plot-wise I hadn’t prepared for. I have planned on in future works that involve Adele talking about her apartment, but in this book I didn’t want it and it gave her a softer feeling that I felt was better after she had relaxed. It didn’t make sense to me to have her soft then hard after a life of running from demons that she had always felt there. I wanted her more experienced when he met her as well. Plus, I found the final product of them meeting more in balance than the scene that was originally written.

Fun Facts

Adele’s original name was Eliza.

Gabriel wasn’t originally planned to be in the series.


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Deleted Scenes From The Blasphemer Series: Maxwell Demon Part 1

Throughout the writing process, Maxwell Demon underwent many changes. I’ve shared that when I was back writing it I was just about finished and deleted the entire last chapter and part of the chapter before that one because it simply didn’t feel right. Along with this over time I have shared other things that have changed. This is part one of a two part post sharing some of these differences.

Some changes happened during professionally editing forever being lost for a great story and some never made it past the drafting phase. For readers, you may recognize names or scenes, but remember them differently or names being completely different from the version you read. Things change a lot during the writing process.

I hope you enjoy!


Maxwell Demon Introduction

I had originally posted this in the group Bachman’s Blasphemers, the fan group created for fans and others that would like to stay up-to-date more regularly than the author page and the series page for the books, but for whatever reason Facebook glitched and wouldn’t allow it to be posted. I took that as an opportunity to post it on the website in a more expanded version. I always love, as a reader, hearing about an author’s process in creating a book I enjoyed or even details behind the stories that didn’t make the cut into what got published. I’m not the only one, I’m sure, so here are some behind-the-scenes and spoilers from the book, The Blasphemer Series: Maxwell Demon.

Original Beginning

The original beginning of Maxwell Demon was much different than what made the final cut and went into publication.

Raw Excerpt

Visions of wisped crimson hair across pale naked shoulders quickly burn into flames of the swords that clashed, the magic that spilled over across the field of Heaven, and blood poured like rain upon the Earth in those days. The Clash of Angels was and is still the most epic of battles. No amount of bodies upon the Earth’s soil can compare to the magnitude of loss that occurred during that great battle. Maxwell, alongside Lucifer and many others, were chained and cast from Heaven into a special pit far from the wonderful grace that is Heaven and God.

Maxwell remembered it well, the great battle and striking down his friends that had turned to the foe. As time passed, the irony of magical immortal energy beings trying to kill each other grew within him. He damned God, he damned others, but eventually he damned himself. He wasn’t alone, there were many other Fallen Angels, but he wasn’t like many of them that twisted and contorted into evil, horrible, and vile creatures punishing humankind. He and a small group took to a lighter pace of life, those like him chose to live amongst the humans they once stood up for and lost the grace of God for.

Keeping a journal, he logged every thought to pass the time. He knew he wasn’t like everyone else and he knew he was solitary in his existence amongst humankind. It was depressing to see once magnificent creatures, humans, turn against one another living with their emotions running amok and living for devious means. Greed, wrath, vanity, gluttony, and the rest were all human made creations and not of God themselves.

Night after night his heavy boots stomped the streets of New York, Tokyo, London, Paris, but he found a home in the City of Angels, another irony that wasn’t lost on him. Night after night he found himself reflecting upon his memories of better times and her, Lilith. Sitting upon the middle of the H on the Hollywood sign, his head tilted back and his eyes shut, it was exhausting prancing around the world using his energy to mask his demonic form.

“You’re thinking of her again, aren’t you Maxziel.” A low voice interrupted his rest from a black hovering mist. As the darkened mist moved closer it transformed into a human wearing a long black trench coat, jeans, boots, and a white shirt mirroring Max’s own apparel. “I’ve lost count on how long it has been, but you eventually have got to stop thinking about her. No one has heard from her in countless centuries. She just stopped existing. If she had changed planes of existence we would’ve heard something.” The man then kicked Maxwell’s boot to get his attention.

Max’s eyes finally opened and stared across from him at the other Fallen Angel, “She couldn’t have just stopped existing, that’s now it works. Perhaps her soul went elsewhere? Azriel, she’s in the world, I just don’t know where. She can’t just be simply lost to time and space. God doesn’t do that, they don’t work that way.”

The scene continued into him finding Adele, but I removed all this and started over, this isn’t unheard of for me to do. What I had written didn’t feel right and I had shelved the entire project until I decided to start over. I do like how this scene showed a love/hate of the Fallen Angels, but I didn’t like how Azriel wasn’t more aggressive. I saw him as a forceful type of being, an in your face ‘admit it’ type.


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Interview of a Character: Imogene from The Blasphemer Series: Harvest

The Interviewer is a mysterious figure that has contact with the characters of The Blasphemer Series and thus interviews them time to time. In this interview you will see them interacting with Imogene, a female character from book two Harvest. Imogene is a gifted Seer of the Present.

This particular interview happened before tragic events that unfolded in The Blasphemer Series. To understand better it is recommended you read The Blasphemer Series: Harvest.


The Interviewer: When you’re introduced into the book you’re struggling with withdrawals, do you wish you’d been introduced in a different way?

Imogene: It’s how the story went. I can’t change it or how I was living my life at the time. You’d try and find an escape too if you have my curse they call a gift.

The Interviewer: Can you share with us something we may not know about you?

Imogene: I liked cheesecake and coffee.

The Interviewer: Is there anything that upset you about the book?

Imogene: It seems I was almost forgotten except for Margot and Isiah. I miss him.

The Interviewer: Will we see you in future books?

Imogene: Perhaps. Not all of the stories have been told yet. It’s up to the author to discover a way to bring me back into the fold. I’m not sure how I would or my purpose. It’s not like I had much of one in the first place.

The Interviewer: Well that’s just not true. A lot of people like you. They wanted to know about you, your relationship with Isiah, and some even asked the author to do a book of just you. As a side-story type of thing.

Imogene: Interesting. It’d be interesting to see what the author would have to say about me in a side-story book. What would that even be called? A companion novel?

The Interviewer: Yes, that’s what those books would be called. So, Imogene, we know what happens near the end of the book. So is there something you wish all the readers knew that perhaps got left out of the story?

Imogene: There is something, but I’m not sure how well it would’ve done. You see the writer writes in a certain style that may leave out things. If the main character can’t witness it then sometimes it doesn’t make it in. It’s a mix of third-person narration and first-person. I’ve personally never seen a book written like it. I wish she would’ve left how I fought hard. How even when ingested I was kicking, screaming, and fighting.

The Interviewer: Do you feel you were given no justice?

Imogene: In some ways yes and in some ways no. I don’t want to really go into it. There’s nothing that can be done now.

The Interviewer: Since you’re on the other side is there any knowledge you can give us that those still living may not know?

Imogene: There’s a spy among them, but he’ll get his. He’ll flip and ultimately help them.

The Interviewer: Will you say who?

Imogene: I’m not allowed to.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you’d like to say to the remaining Seers, Briar and Dante?

Imogene: Dante’s going to be just fine. I am not allowed to say too much, but without him the world would truly fall apart. Briar is in good hands even though she doesn’t realize it, being possessed by anyone else would destroy her.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you’d like to say to readers or potential readers?

Imogene: I’m gone, I pass in this book. That’s no secret, but what many don’t know is I can now live on because of them. The author’s a bit weird, but she has done good by me by telling my story. If you read it I can live on in your memory and thoughts. I do hope you’ll read it. Please read.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you wish to say perhaps to Margot or Isiah if they read this interview?

Imogene: I am sorry Margot. I did love you and still do. You didn’t have to take me in and you did. You were a mother to me and I never appreciated you. To Isiah, I guess I’d say, I miss and love you.


Margot has gotten to read the interview and it helped her with her mourning. Isiah was too busy to read it. Read The Blasphemer Series: Harvest when it re-releases to understand all of this better.


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Interview of a Character: Maxwell from The Blasphemer Series: Maxwell Demon

The Interviewer is a mysterious figure that has contact with the characters of The Blasphemer Series and thus interviews them time to time. In this interview you will see them interacting with Maxwell, a the main male character of the book Maxwell Demon from The Blasphemer Series.

This particular interview has a history that it happened to be ‘found’ in the ‘archives’ from The Alexandrian vaults. It takes place after the first book published. No-one knows where it came from or who The Interviewer is.


The Interviewer: How do you feel about your story being chronicled for mass readers to get a hold of and read?

Maxwell: I think the story must be told. It’s an important endeavor to open your mind to a new possibly.

The Interviewer: What do you think of L. Bachman being the one to write your story and the stories of others?

Maxwell: She’s alright, she’s good people. I like her tattoos.

The Interviewer: Whatever happened to Eshu?

Maxwell: :chuckles: Gabriel took care of him about as much as someone like Eshu could be taken care of. You must understand Eshu is a guardian and a very powerful spiritual being. He learned his lesson, which is all I can say about that.

The Interviewer: What’s your biggest regret?

Maxwell: In the book, it’s listed as never getting to Lilith in time, but truth be it there is a bigger regret that I have and that is defying The Mother and The Father.

The Interviewer: You witnessed reincarnation first hand with following Lilith through her many lives, what were the best life and the worse that you saw her go through?

Maxwell: The worse life she lived I witnessed for a brief period was that of her as a child. You must think of things in the time frame of which they happened. At one time in history to be red haired was thought of as a bad thing, a sign of a witch. We all know that Witches come in all shapes, colors, backgrounds, and countries, but in this particular life she had been hidden away for a very long time. Her hair had been sooted and changed colors with dyes of the time. In the end, she had been murdered by a mob worried she was going to bring bad upon the land.

The best life she lived I can remember was that of peace. She was in Scotland living on the outskirts. Her hovel overlooked a valley and a river. It was quiet and peaceful. Sadly, like most of her lives she had either been killed or died tragically in ways I couldn’t do anything about. In this one, she had gotten sick and died. I couldn’t heal her. When she saw me for the smallest of moments I could swear she recognized me, but by the time I had gotten to her she had been sick for a very long time. I still don’t know what she died of.

The Interviewer: We only get a taste of a few of her lives, can you elaborate on others? Why is it so hard for you to find her? The compass worked in the published account why not just do that earlier?

Maxwell: She had been a male in several lives, a warrior or soldier that led to her death in those lives. She had been just about anything you could be, must remember she had been around a very…very long time. A monk, a cult leader, a housewife, and even a school teacher are a few that are coming to mind. She’s been every color variation, a wide range of ages in her lives, and involved in most religions.

I simply hadn’t thought about making a compass, the idea never came to mind until later years after struggling for many lifetimes of never finding her. I had my own struggles as well giving me problems and diverting me. Goodwitch Anya also found out about me and contacted me. Things went smoother after that.

The Interviewer: Have you spent more time on Earth since the book has been released?

Maxwell: I have no comment.

The Interviewer: Your Enochian tattoos, how do they work? I’ve read that some, that got early copies of the story, wished they had a compass like yours.

Maxwell: :chuckles: Yes, I can see how a compass would work for many. Simply having something right there literally on your hand pointing you to whomever or whatever you need. I can’t begin reveal the magic of my etchings, I got in trouble once before for sharing too much knowledge with mankind.

The Interviewer: Is there anything you wish could’ve left into the story that was taken out?

Maxwell: The story written was specific, it was to launch a series that would talk and discuss many other lives and others stories. This one was specific to me finding Lilith, but I have plenty of stories. Perhaps she’ll write them down as well in a book for others. I have dealt with Raphaim, Canaanites, and have stories upon stories I’d love to share.

The Interviewer: What do you see happening with The Blasphemer Series?

Maxwell: There is a great evil coming. There are many stories to tell.


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[Brief Words] Interview of Armand Rosamilia

In the world of independent publishing, self, and hybrid we know of a great deal of authors that are considered ‘success stories’. They’re the ‘bigwigs’, but what they all are is very hardworking writers that haven’t stopped since they began. They’re the group that are making a living, successfully, as writers in the industry. One of these very inspirational people is named Armand Rosamilia.

This writer, for as long as I have known of him, hasn’t paused. Working hard online and offline continuing his career. Over these years he’s interviewed me many times, inviting me to show up regularly every year since I first heard of him. He’s captured powerful moments in my career. With all that he’s done not once had I gotten to interview him in return and that’s how this interview began.


Armand, you’ve interviewed me so many times I’m thrilled you’re letting me interview you this time. From what I know, you’re a bigwig in the indie world for your zombie fiction. How did that come about? Why zombies?

Bigwig? You’re going to make me blush. Writing about zombies started as me wanting to write a zombie story, just one story, and then move on to something else in horror. I wanted to write a lot of different things horror-related. I ended up writing a short story with a female lead, Darlene Bobich. Figured I was done. Then a publisher posted they were looking for an extreme zombie novella. The idea for Highway To Hell was born, and that eventually lead into the Dying Days series (with Darlene Bobich as the lead). It’s been nearly ten years, nine main books and just as many side books in the Dying Days world… and it really put me on the map for zombie fiction.

Are you working on anything new? Future plans?

Always working on something new. I have 14 open projects on my whiteboard right now. Crime thrillers. Horror. Contemporary fiction. Noir crime fiction. Nonfiction. All in various stages and many with deadlines I need to get to, so I can add more to the list.

What inspires you when you want to write? Is there anything specific that helps the words flow?

Yes. Fear. Fear of having to go back into retail management, which I did for over twenty years and hated every second of. I’m blessed to be going on my eighth year of writing full-time and making a living at this, but I haven’t gotten comfortable enough to not look over my shoulder at what could’ve been my life.

What’s difficult for you when it comes to writing?

Some days finding the time to actually write. There is so much promotion and learning about selling books and the business changes so frequently. I feel I have to keep up. I also have two podcasts and own the group they’re on, so that is a full-time job in itself. The writing itself is the easy part.

You’ve been podcasting for a long time, how did you get into that?

I was on AM and then FM radio for a couple of years. I saw the writing on the wall. People were listening to more podcasts. I felt I had more control over content and what I could do. I started Arm Cast Podcast in 2014 and have over 300 episodes so far. I interview cool authors (such as yourself!) and get to pick their brains. I’ve also been co-hosting The Mando Method Podcast with Chuck Buda for four years. We talk about writing and publishing.

What do you like most about podcasting and interviewing other people?

Selfishly, it’s all about me. I want to know the author’s tricks. How they deal with the changes in publishing. Who they like working with and who I should steer away from. I can also see where I stand in the specific genres by whether or not I have read them or whoever they are reading. It keeps me honest in that I have to stay on my game.

Most writers declare they cannot begin work without a cup of coffee, but for you what is it? What fuels your work machine? Any habits you’d like to share? Mediation, perhaps?

Umm… coffee. Lots and lots of coffee, in fact. I am a huge fan of three kinds: Dunkin’, Death Wish and Reapers Brew. I figured out I drink over 1,400 cups a year. Why did I figure this out? Because I had a nice burst of high-octane coffee in my system. It helps me to keep going and focus.

Your wife and you have a wonderful dynamic duo of creativity, how do you separate work and home life?

When work is over we might talk a bit about our jobs but it’s usually during dinner or dinner prep. We then don’t dwell on it, especially if either of us has had a bad day. With the quarantine, she’s now working from home. She’s set up in the bedroom and I have my office. We meet in the kitchen for lunch every day and catch up on what’s going on at work, and about six each night we stop working and spend the evening together without work stuff. She is my biggest supporter. She handles the money, the contracts and keeps me in line when I spend too much time doing non-writing things.

When you were younger did you want to become a writer or did this develop later on?

When I was twelve I started reading Dean Koontz. That was it for me. I wanted to become a writer and never looked back, although it took another thirty years for me to make enough to do this for a living. I’d love to someday meet Mr. Koontz, shake his hand and tell him what an inspiration he was to me and still is.

I really could ask you a million questions, but I’ll ask a very common interview question, do you have any advice for aspiring authors?

Read. A lot. Not just in your genre, either. You can learn from reading in other genres, especially nonfiction. Watch the sentence structure. Characterization. All of it. I am not a fan of romance but when my wife watches Hallmark movies I follow along to see the beats in the story. I drive her nuts when I announce ‘end of act one’ or something like that. I can appreciate the writing in any genre and try to incorporate it into the way I look at writing and my work. If I only read horror books my work would suffer.

Check him out more here:

Project Entertainment Network: https://projectentertainmentnetwork.com/

Website: http://armandrosamilia.com






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