Tag Archives: poetry

Dark Poetry Submissions Open – Exit Device

I am not organizing this collection of poetry, just helping spread the word of this project for another. Some of you may be familiar with my work with Oliver Sheppard. Exit Device is his mastermind project.


Cover(c)Oliver Sheppard

Project Details:

  • Deadline: September 10th
  • Submit to:exitdevicezine@gmail.com

Words From Oliver:

I hope to get Issue No. 1 out by Halloween. The deadline to submit is September 10th. EXIT DEVICE will be an old school, photocopied, saddle-stapled, black and white DIY zine. It will have no web or social media presence save for the email address above. Right now I cannot afford to pay contributors anything save for contributor’s copies. Looking for dark, weird, bizarre, etc poetry. Avant-garde and experimental stuff is welcome, as is traditional verse. EXIT DEVICE will probably come out once per year.

The name “Exit Device” is from jargon used in the euthanasia/assisted suicide community; the term refers to any mechanism or apparatus that ends its user’s life. The cover image of issue 1 is “Daguerreotype of Nothing” from 1850, an image held by the Getty Museum. I’ve gotten permission from the Getty Museum to use the image for the cover of the zine.

So far, about 20 poems have been accepted. I’ll probably include no more than 50. If you submit and I’ve hit that limit, it may be considered for Issue No. 2.

THIS IS CLOSED NOW

Poetry Month Sales

Last year I challenged myself to create a new poem every day for the month of April for Napowrimo. This year there are no challenges, but there are sales! Both poetry books I have out are going to only be 99 cents on all retailers for the entire month.

This is not a normal poetry book. It is an exorcism of the soul. A poet will write about the highs and lows of their life in excruciating beautiful ways. Wrapping their pain with a ribbon to either be kept as a secret or presented. L. Bachman has gathered some of her most emotionally raw verses selected from a nineteen-year period of her life and is the first volume of complete non-fiction to date.

With bruised white knuckles, created by a humbled self-diagnosed battered and broken being on the road to healing and coping from a painful childhood. This is a display of work created to express personal struggles and surviving through periods of insomnia, moments of love, depression, anxiety, and healing.

Cover to cover you will read the inner workings of a reclusive introvert that has spent her lifetime trying to answer her own questions about who she is, what part she plays in life, and trying to heal from things she couldn’t. You will see into the mind of the woman known as L. Bachman through over thirty poems left up to the reader to interpret with an introduction by author KJ. Taylor.

Go to sales


Award-winning writer L. Bachman, author of the acclaimed Blasphemer series of horror novels, presents here, with Melankholia, a new triumph in dark poetry. Melankholia is Bachman’s second collection of dark verse. With this work, Bachman expands upon the brand of poetic gloom established in All of My Every Things, her first poetry collection which was released to widespread praise in 2019. The pages of Melankholia call forth a literary darkness that qualifies the collection for membership among the first ranks of the 21st century’s new dark poetry movement.

Drawing upon the styles of Dark Romanticism and Gothic Horror, and pulling from the traditions of weird horror fiction while employing a unique style of introspective lyricism, Bachman’s words both examine and balance the interplay between light and darkness, presenting to the reader a troubling ambiguity between psychological trauma and supernatural horror: In Bachman’s world, the pages of Melankholia reveal, darkness is always present, but light does not signify asylum from catastrophe, either: “Holding the sun / I found the light is frightening / Perhaps I will burn to ash.”Melankholia is a landmark new collection of dark poetry. At turns haunting and rich, the poems of the work leave enough room for the dim light of hope to seep in. Each poem tells a tale. Melankholia includes poetry from All of My Every Things, pieces created in 2020, and previously unpublished works from the past twenty years of her life.

Go to sales


Once you click a ‘go to sales’ link you’ll be presented with a landing page. Click the ‘buy now’ on that page and it will direct you to all the retailers of the ebook/digital editions of the above books. Click your preferred and find the sales there.

Melankholia, All of My Every Things, and Harvest Updates & Reveals

Last weekend the digital version of Melankholia released, but as planned the paperback edition released on October 5th, how exciting. Along with this wonderful news, I made a small announcement. The announcement was about All of My Every Things will have a second edition run with additional poetry and the long awaited paperback edition, but before the second edition will release and the website posts about that let’s take time to appreciate that a second poetry book has been released.

Melankholia

This book is now live in digital and in paperback formats. It is the first book of poetry that I’ve branded with the Edkar logo. To learn more about Edkar read Edkar Press where I explain more about this organization method I’m using, i.e. publishing house. I have previously mentioned Melankholia on the website read What is Melankholia?

Melankholia has some selected poetry from All of My Every Things included near the end, as well as poetry written from this year’s Napowrimo back in April 2020, and a lot of recent works I’ve polished up for publication. All of this beautiful hard work is introduced by Oliver Sheppard. An amazing poet in his own right and I recommend checking out his work. My favorite is Thirteen Nocturnes.


All of My Every Things

All of My Every Things was previously published last year. It was a simple digital release with plans of a paperback release to follow, but never sitting well with me, I quietly postponed it, but finally with some polishing and adding additional poetry the paperback is coming. I have gone in and updated the book.


Harvest

Harvest is coming out as a re-release November 24th, 2020 with the publisher Three Furies Press. This is just a reminder that it will mark the continuation of The Blasphemer Series with the book following Ghosts, coming out 2021 around August if everything stays on course.

The Word: 5 Tips for Poetry Writing

How does one start in poetry? How can someone go from novel writing to poetic prose? Both valid questions and both questions you may ask. I can only share from my personal experience, but as an actively working fiction novelist and poet, I shared a few tips that may help you along your journey.

  • Read as much poetry as possible. Read a vast variety of different poetry from different poets throughout history and even current. This, for me, was a gateway to expanding my horizons. Every new poem or poet I came across I could see or try to see where that poet’s message lied. Whether it was about a falling leave in Autumn or the great despair of losing a child.
  • Learn more about poetry itself beyond the reading of the different prose you come across. The research into the poetic world will introduce you to more than you may know. For example, you will learn about free-styling poetry compared to a structured haiku set-up. These are important upon you developing a style for yourself. You may even discover you want to try your hand at all the different poetry forms!
  • Keep a journal nearby. I already practice this as a novel idea that may come and go. I will need to write it down before I lose my thought. Poetry ideas and lines can come just as quickly as they fade away. You may think of a beautiful way of saying something you’ve struggled with for some time, a journal can net that fish before it escapes.
  • Play with your words. Experiment with assonance and initial rhyme. These can help develop a flow in the work and a style. Along with this experiment, with metaphors.
  • Don’t be afraid to restart a poem. Editing your work is a good way to polish it. For me, this was natural as I would write a chapter draft or even a manuscript draft and re-approach it with fresh eyes during the phase of writing of self-editing. A poem doesn’t have to be perfect and if you think it is the first time you’ve written it, approach it again later on to test your original feelings of the work. This is also a good way to develop your writing and poetry, never publish the first draft of anything you ever write. Publishers will know and so will readers, it will feel ‘off’.

Related Posts

Learn Your Poets: Part 4

The month of April isn’t just about writing poems and taking part in Napowrimo. It is also about appreciating poetry from others and poets. I wanted to do a huge series on each poet that I knew of, including some of my favorites, but decided to break it down into smaller digestible portions.

Margaret Atwood – November 18, 1939 in Ottawa, Canada she is one of the few on the series that is still living. She is a poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, inventor, teacher, and environmental activist. Throughout her career she has produced eighteen books of poetry, eight children’s books, two graphic novels, eleven books of non-fiction, nine collections of short fiction, eighteen novels, and several small press pieces in poetry and fiction. She is the creator of a product called LongPen. This is a device that allows anyone in the world to write with ink from a device using the internet and a robotic hand.

She is currently best known for writing the book that became the Hulu Original series Handmaiden’s Tale, but she has also had a hand in several other movies/documentaries, including but not limited to Awaiting Atwood, In the Wake of the Flood, and Yesno.

She is best known for her prose fiction and for her feminist perspective. Atwood began writing at a young age, but more seriously began writing decades later in her life after finishing her time at Victoria College at the University of Toronto. She went on with her studies completing her master’s degree in English Literature at Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Her some of her most noteworthy works are Handmaiden’s Tale, The Animals in That Country, Stone Mattress, The Blind Assassin, and Payback.

Homer – The year of Homer’s birth isn’t known, but what is known is that he was born in Ionia. Ionia is located Western Anatolia, because this state existed 7th–6th centuries BC it’s safe to say Homer was born around this time frame. Professionally, Homer was known as a bard, poet, and author. He’s legendary for being the creator of two epic poems. The Iliad and the Odyssey, works that are the central works of ancient Greek literature. These two pieces are the center of a debate called The Homeric Question.

The Homeric Question covers the doubts and debate over Homer really was, if epic poems are the work of multiple poets or a single genius, and by whom, when, where, and under what circumstances were the poems composed. I recommend looking it up for yourself.

Most about Homer is lost now leaving many to believe that what was lost and what is known is of no scholarly importance.

I do not know much about Homer. I first learned about him studying Plato. Some of the information above mentioned I learned during my time in college and learned over the years after that. I don’t remember much, if anything, from before college. I could’ve easily done more due to the internet, but as this series is a ‘quick bite’ type of series to familiarize a reader and not create fully flushed out biographies I recommend doing your own research if you wish to learn more.

It is said that Homer passed in Ios, Greece.

Oscar Wilde – Is an Irish poet, author, and playwright born October 16, 1854 in Westland Row, Dublin, Ireland. Before the decline of his popularity due to his convictions he wrote many pieces that are popular today. The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Importance of Being Earnest are his best known works. Besides these two he wrote essays, short fiction, journalism, and editorship. For a period of time he was a fixture in the theatrical world. Some of his notable plays are Salome, The Importance of Being Earnest, and An Ideal Husband, just to name a few.

Outside of his work he is known for his criminal conviction for sodomy and gross indecency (homosexual acts). He spent time in prison. It’s noted that he found a ‘spiritual renewal’ and wrote a plea to the Society of Jesus requesting a six-month Catholic retreat. It wasn’t approved and continued his time in prison. His goal was to be welcomed into the Catholic Church. His time in Prison took its tole and the last years of his life he was impoverished and in exile.

Taking the name Sebastian Melmoth he wrote to the editor of the Daily Chronicle explaining the brutal conditions inside English prisons and advocating for repel reforms. This all led to an essay being written called The Soul of Man Under Socialism.

The Picture of Dorian Gray has influenced movies and television of modern time. The character Dorian Gray has made appearances in movies and television continuing the influence of Oscar Wilde.

It’s reported that his last words before his death on November 30th, 1900 were, “This wallpaper and I are fighting a duel to the death. Either it goes or I do.” He passed in Paris, France.

Percy Shelley – Percy Bysshe Shelley was born August 4, 1792 in Horsham, United Kingdom. He was English romantic poet. His career expands further than just a poet as he branched into other areas of work such as dramatist, essayist, and novelist. His best known works are The Cloud, Ode to the West Wind, Ozymandias, Music, To a Skylark, The Mask of Anarchy, and When Soft Voices Die.

Besides his work he is also known for being married to Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, the famous horror novelist of Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. When they married she took his last name making her the now well-known Mary Shelley. He began an affair with Mary during his marriage to Harriet Westbrook, believing she was only married to him for his money.

He is/was considered to be ahead of his time for belief of equality being a natural state.

During his time at Oxford, he wrote and essay entitled The Necessity of Atheism, in which he argued belief is involuntary and one shouldn’t be persecute someone for having beliefs that they cannot control. This essay caused him to be dismissed. Before his dismissal he was given the nickname ‘Mad Shelley’ for his prankster ways. For example, he once blew up a tree using gunpowder.

His beliefs in atheism caused him suffer the loss of custody of his own children after his ex-wife Harriet. The government justified this as ‘his lack of religion being a sign of an unfit parent’. His son, Charles, and daughter, Ianthe, were raised by foster parents instead.

He is still referred to as England’s ‘Lost Poet’.

He passed drowning in the Gulf of Spezia near Lerici, Italy, on July 8, 1822.

Following this ‘Learn Your Poets’ series, you’ll read about poets from ancient times to now. From Sappho to Atwood. This series will be of the poets I have read in my time, I am aware of, and because of this may miss some so please don’t have hurt feelings. They were not left off on purpose only if I didn’t know of them.


Interesting Reads and Related Content

Napowrimo: Day 30 #30poemsin30days

For more information:

April is National Poetry Month. An entire month dedicated to poems and poetry bringing attention to and bring appreciation toward poets of all styles and types.

Official website of Napowrimo to read and catch up. They give prompts to help those that may need some inspiration. They also provide resources to poets.

Like poetry? Why not check out my poetry book I released? It’s 19 years of my life in poetry! All of My Every Things on Amazon for .99 cents now.

Napowrimo: Day 29 #30poemsin30days

For more information:

April is National Poetry Month. An entire month dedicated to poems and poetry bringing attention to and bring appreciation toward poets of all styles and types.

Official website of Napowrimo to read and catch up. They give prompts to help those that may need some inspiration. They also provide resources to poets.

Like poetry? Why not check out my poetry book I released? It’s 19 years of my life in poetry! All of My Every Things on Amazon for .99 cents now.

Napowrimo: Day 28 #30poemsin30days

For more information:

April is National Poetry Month. An entire month dedicated to poems and poetry bringing attention to and bring appreciation toward poets of all styles and types.

Official website of Napowrimo to read and catch up. They give prompts to help those that may need some inspiration. They also provide resources to poets.

Like poetry? Why not check out my poetry book I released? It’s 19 years of my life in poetry! All of My Every Things on Amazon for .99 cents now.

Napowrimo: Day 27 #30poemsin30days

For more information:

April is National Poetry Month. An entire month dedicated to poems and poetry bringing attention to and bring appreciation toward poets of all styles and types.

Official website of Napowrimo to read and catch up. They give prompts to help those that may need some inspiration. They also provide resources to poets.

Like poetry? Why not check out my poetry book I released? It’s 19 years of my life in poetry! All of My Every Things on Amazon for .99 cents now.

Napowrimo: Day 26 #30poemsin30days

For more information:

April is National Poetry Month. An entire month dedicated to poems and poetry bringing attention to and bring appreciation toward poets of all styles and types.

Official website of Napowrimo to read and catch up. They give prompts to help those that may need some inspiration. They also provide resources to poets.

Like poetry? Why not check out my poetry book I released? It’s 19 years of my life in poetry! All of My Every Things on Amazon for .99 cents now.